1v1 blind camera comparison: you choose the better phone


Last week, we did a one-on-one blind camera comparison between two unidentified devices. One of them, as we later revealed, was the highly-acclaimed Samsung Galaxy Note 4 and the other was the iPad Air 2. The phablet won, to no surprise, although Apple's tablet did not perform bad against its potent rival. You can take a look at the results from our blind comparison, if you have not had the chance to see them yet. 

Who will be the winner this time? Well, it is up to our readers to decide! Once again, we picked a pair of handsets and shot a series of photos with them under a variety of conditions. All we ask from you is to take a look at the images provided below and to vote for the camera which you think did better. As always, we won't be revealing the two snappers' identities until the voting has finished at the end of this week. Also, keep in mind that we've downscaled the images to a resolution of about 8MP and erased all metadata that might reveal which phones were used in the shootout.

With that out of the way, let the voting begin! Feel free to examine the samples below and to vote for your favorite using the poll form at the bottom of this post.

Scene 1


This is a scene suitable for testing how well a camera can capture fine details when a moderate amount of artificial light is available. The main source of illumination is a single tungsten bulb above the ornaments on display. Also, the shot contains plenty of red- and gold-colored objects, which can be used to judge a camera's color accuracy. Use the crops and full-resolution samples below to take a closer look.


Scene 2


It was a gloomy afternoon when we took this outdoor shot. The solid-colored areas can be analyzed to see how well a camera deals with digital noise, and the posters on the building's wall contain a lot of details. Also, this particular scene makes it clear to see that there's a difference in the two cameras' field of view.  


Scene 3


And here's a macro shot taken on an overcast afternoon. Plenty of details are waiting to be examined. Take a closer look at the crops and full-resolution samples provided in the slideshow below.


Scene 4


These photos were taken in a well-lit hall inside a mall. It is clear to see that the two phones have set their exposure and color balance settings differently, but which did it better?


Scene 5


And lastly, here's a scene that would be tricky to capture with any camera as the sun is present in the background. In this case, it is up to the camera's software to judge which areas should be prioritized when calculating the exposure setting. Both cameras had their HDR modes turned off, in case you're wondering.


Which phone's camera took better photos?

LG G3 (Phone 1)
85.38%
Sony Xperia Z3 (Phone 2)
14.62%

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