Samsung Galaxy S8 internal tests might start in January

Samsung Galaxy S8 internal tests might start in January
All eyes are on Samsung after the massive Galaxy Note 7 recall. And we presume that the South Korean giant will do its best to deliver a high-quality flagship next year, in order to make up for the Note 7 both in terms of company image and finances.

We've seen plenty of rumors, regarding the Galaxy S8 and the Wall Street Journal recently speculated that its release might be pushed for April. This would be a minor change in Samsung's previous timeline, since the company usually announces its flagships at MWC in Barcelona and launches said phones in March.

New rumors suggest that WSJ could be wrong, though. An unnamed source among Samsung's key suppliers disclosed to The Investor that they're expected to provide initial component batches in January, which could mean that this is when Samsung plans to start the Galaxy S8 tests. The same tipster said that full volume shipments will begin in February, so Samsung will have plenty of time to prepare for a March release, if it chooses to do so.

This was confirmed by another anonymous source, once again from Samsung's suppliers. “Considering the parts supplies, the phone launch could come in March as usual, unlike an earlier report by the Wall Street Journal,” he was quoted saying for The Investor.

With so much on the table, Samsung has a tough task ahead. And with everyone watching, this could be the make or break moment for the company. We honestly doubt that consumers would tolerate a second disastrous release, so we keep our fingers crossed for Samsung next year.

source: TheInvestor via SamMobile

FEATURED VIDEO

7 Comments

2. Bankz

Posts: 2550; Member since: Apr 08, 2016

Smartphones are so f**king boring now. You can just sense that it'll still be the same old phone in slightly new casings. Now, Is it just me or flagship smartphones should be released every 2 years? I mean, I can already forsee 2017 being a same ol boring year for phones like past years.. Of course they'll bring in the oh so slight design change and not much else that's actually meaningful. Though I understand the implication of this from a business perspective but oh well.. That's why since the S3 days upgrading yearly has become redundant and unintersting because there's usually not anything new and all that useful between yearly upgrades heck even between 2 year upgrades I'd argue..

3. trojan_horse

Posts: 5868; Member since: May 06, 2016

Probably, but many consumers do upgrade year-over-year out of luxury or just wanting to have the latest model, and not really out of necessity. But releasing upgrades yearly is kinda a necessity for OEMs, as it's all about business - business as usual.

6. sissy246

Posts: 7124; Member since: Mar 04, 2015

Agree with you and that is why I go every two years. If I go 2 years I get more changes.

9. King_bilo

Posts: 115; Member since: May 20, 2015

I also go every 2 years. first smartphone was a nokia symbian then blackberry and then galaxy s3. I used my s3 for 2 years and its still working to this day. to be honest, there isnt much difference except the battery is s**te compared what you have today. but even that is arguable since you could remove the battery on the s3. now i use moto X 2014. i was going to change it because the Note7 was so tempting. and thenit started blowing up. Maybe note8...

4. bubbadoes

Posts: 1225; Member since: May 03, 2012

they haven't fixed the Note7. point that out PA

5. bolosantosi

Posts: 103; Member since: Sep 20, 2016

Like they haven't in almost every article about Samsung

7. sissy246

Posts: 7124; Member since: Mar 04, 2015

The note 7 is gone so why would they fix it. Don't worry PA brings it up in 9 out of 10 Samsung articles even though it is gone.

Latest Stories

This copy is for your personal, non-commercial use only. You can order presentation-ready copies for distribution to your colleagues, clients or customers at https://www.parsintl.com/phonearena or use the Reprints & Permissions tool that appears at the bottom of each web page. Visit https://www.parsintl.com/ for samples and additional information.