Apple: no, we didn't sacrifice Face ID quality for quantity, Bloomberg's report is 'completely false'


Yesterday, a Bloomberg report came out, claiming that, in a radical departure from Apple's usual standards, Face ID suppliers are getting away with "good enough" modules, if that can speed up the production process. The requirements for the accuracy of the dot projector that splashes up to 30,000 points of light on your face to create a depth map, and matches them to a stored pattern algorithm to unlock your phone were essentially lowered, suggests Bloomberg, when it became clear that just 20% of the initial batches could pass Apple's initial stringent conditions. 

In a nutshell, suppliers were greenlit to sacrifice quality for quantity, claims a "person with knowledge of the process." Apple, however, begs to disagree, and issued the following rebuttal to Bloomberg's piece on the teething pains of planting the Face ID tech in a retail device:


The reason Apple cites the "1 in a million" probability as a benchmark, is that this is what was claimed by Phil Schiller during the iPhone X keynote announcement, and in the subsequent marketing materials and Face ID white papers. 

Note that Apple doesn't say how it got there, just that this level of probability still stands. That's twenty times higher than Touch ID anyway, and overall a much ado about nothing, given that you also have plenty of other options to unlock your phone securely. A talking fox avatar, though - that's only possible with the Face ID kit, so in the end it will be all worth the innovation trouble.

source: Reuters

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48 Comments

1. YeahYeah

Posts: 250; Member since: Mar 16, 2016

Come on we all know they'll never admit..

8. AVVA1

Posts: 228; Member since: Aug 01, 2017

We will never know. LOL

12. Darckent

Posts: 89; Member since: Sep 17, 2016

Yeh because apple will admit to the fact they are reducing the QUALITY...what do you expect apple to say? We all saw how great it worked at their conference lol There is going to be alot of bad press about face id when people get their hands on this phone ....bookmark this comment

16. trojan_horse

Posts: 5868; Member since: May 06, 2016

Hey, Apple's stock has gone down due to this news about Apple reducing the accuracy of Face ID for quantity. Since we all know that Apple likes to sue anyone who does something that affects it's sales or profits, shouldn't Apple be suing Bloomberg if this news was false? But Apple can't sue Bloomberg for this, because it'll only make the truth come to light, thus making things even worse for Apple.

22. uncle_gadget

Posts: 1050; Member since: Sep 20, 2017

Well yes and no. Bloomberg is a media group. So for one they are protected by journalist laws. They don't have to disclose any sources of any info. So yes they could just make it up and just say they had a source who gave them info and it not be true. But this excuse, sounds way to specific to a detail for it to be blown off as some made up lie. Someone with inside knowledge leaked this info to Bloomberg and Bloomberg I'm sure has been wrong, but it doesn't matter if they ever are. Apple isn't gonna sue, because they aren't gonna want to draw more attention to it, like you said if it is true; or be afraid that the negative attention being brought to it, could potentially ruin sales.

20. uncle_gadget

Posts: 1050; Member since: Sep 20, 2017

Really? Well they knew about the iPhone 4 issues and lied at first saying there was no issue. And then an engineer came forward stating he told Jobs and Jobs said in his own words, "we though it wasn't a big deal". No the fact is, "he felt" it wasn't a big deal. Yet he spent the money on a fix and tried to sell it as an accessory. Apple has knowingly sold defective products. People have sued them for it. Many have won and many who should have won didn't, because the judge stated in one case. After the warranty period, Apple doesn't have to disclose any information on known defects. But the fact is, if they know there is a defect while under warranty and don't fix it because maybe it won;t show until afterwards, then that lets them off the hook to spend money to fix the defect. http://www.macrage.com/class-action-lawsuit-against-apple-filed-corbin-rasmussen-suing-tech-giant-claiming-his-imac-screen "Rasmussen may have a tough time getting a judge to agree with his claims, however. Earlier this year, two iPhone owners initiated a class action suit against Apple and AT&T. The suit, brought after the warranty for the phones expired, alleged the phones had defective on-off buttons and that the two companies were “conspiring to conceal evidence of a defective cable” inside the phones. A judge dismissed that case, noting Apple had no obligation to disclose defects in its products after the warranty period had expired." All corporations are evil. They don't care about you. What they do care about is money and facts proves that corporations will kill you for money as long as they can get away with it. That is a proven fact.

49. jackwong64

Posts: 60; Member since: Apr 23, 2014

Put it this way, even they admit it or not, we all have our own thought. We don't have to care unless we are holding a lot of Apple stock lol

3. kanagadeepan

Posts: 1258; Member since: Jan 24, 2012

We know their accuracy, when they first displayed that so called tech on the stage...

47. Klinton

Posts: 1408; Member since: Oct 24, 2016

How this Face-ID BS can be a main selling point, is beyond me. LOL Because everything else on Notch X is old , fugly, and cheap tech. But hey, the power of US media propaganda makes miracles. Right?

5. iampun33t

Posts: 136; Member since: Apr 17, 2013

Yes. I believe Apple. They say its all good, so its all good. /s

6. haruken

Posts: 306; Member since: Nov 06, 2013

Why would a multi billion dollars company lie about their $999 device, that also failed live on stage, being flawed.

23. uncle_gadget

Posts: 1050; Member since: Sep 20, 2017

Yes, because multi-billion dollar company's have NEVER lied before in history!!!

7. midan

Posts: 2850; Member since: Oct 09, 2017

The whole idea of this rumours was hilarious from the beginning. So they just suddenly decided to make very complex tech worse and still except it to work, sure..

21. tedkord

Posts: 17356; Member since: Jun 17, 2009

What's ridiculous? They couldn't produce the part in mass quantities, and it's a needed part for their soon to be released flagship phone. Sales were going to be severely constrained, so rather than have that happen, they relax the requirements so more units pass inspection. It's perfectly plausible, and probably true.

27. uncle_gadget

Posts: 1050; Member since: Sep 20, 2017

Don't explain facts to him. Many defects in cars have found to be, because the automaker was trying to cut costs in making the vehicles to increase profit. Firestone was sued by the US Gov't almost out of existance for knowingly selling defective tires, that would blow out, because the manufacturer was told to use a less high quality rubbers material and steel belts. These tires would blow or go flat, from striking things in the road, that they should have been able to handle with no issue. Tires that were stated to be 50-70,000 mile tires were lasting only half the time. Bosch and Lomb was sued for packing contacts in a fancier box claiming they were a more expensive type, but in fact were exactly the same as basic ones. http://www.nytimes.com/1996/08/02/business/bausch-lomb-settles-class-action-lawsuit.html Apple was sued for price fixing which they claimed they were not doing and more. I serious doubt this was made up. Its way to specific to the issue we know is happening. Low production. Companies have cut corners to increase production. It is firstly not illegal, as long as such does not cause safety issues or compromises the integrity of the product.

10. scarface21173

Posts: 686; Member since: Aug 17, 2014

Apple is in a transition period at the minute, if it doesnt come off there doomed. Once negativity starts coming out the press start spreading. it catches on.

13. piyath

Posts: 2445; Member since: Mar 23, 2012

Apple normally don't drop the ball on their consumer devices just like google. They want to keep the 100% public trust and that's why their devices are selling like crazy.

17. Peacetoall unregistered

Ha ha ha ha ha thanks for the good laugh mate. May god bless you

24. tedkord

Posts: 17356; Member since: Jun 17, 2009

Yeah, bendgate, antennagate, Apple Maps and all those MacBook graphics card failures never happened. They've never had a firmware release that bricked iPhones, either. And, this certainly wasn't dropping the ball:https://www.phonearena.com/news/Things-arent-adding-up-as-the-iOS-11-calculator-is-giving-the-wrong-answers_id99282 Apple drops the ball. What they have is an army of people like you who will defend them no matter what.

28. uncle_gadget

Posts: 1050; Member since: Sep 20, 2017

That is a lie. Good luck being that naive.

48. Sammy_DEVIL737

Posts: 1529; Member since: Nov 28, 2016

Next joke plsss....

14. darkkjedii

Posts: 31029; Member since: Feb 05, 2011

Damage control lol. Good rebutall Apple...not.

29. nctx77

Posts: 2540; Member since: Sep 03, 2013

How the hell do you know it’s damage control? The incident on the stage was simply the phone locking him out do to other people trying to access it. It did what it’s suppose to do. You have no evidence that face ID doesn’t work. Until you have proof, keep your mouth shut!!

32. tedkord

Posts: 17356; Member since: Jun 17, 2009

The incident on the stage was face id falling. It did not do what it was supposed to do. It's never supposed to simply go back to the lock screen,which it did the first time. If it was locked due to others using it to many times, he'd have gotten the message the first time.

15. jeroome86

Posts: 2314; Member since: Apr 12, 2012

Gotta skipped this one. Just more negative news. That notch bothers me. Just can’t unsee that junk.

18. darkkjedii

Posts: 31029; Member since: Feb 05, 2011

Quite a few bans, and limits lately.

25. tedkord

Posts: 17356; Member since: Jun 17, 2009

Like who?

19. uncle_gadget

Posts: 1050; Member since: Sep 20, 2017

It doesn't matter either way. What does matter is this. We already know there are production issues. But out of all the made up excuses that could be done, like that made up BS when the Face ID demo failed, this excuse sounds very legit as oppose to some made up one. Example, people come in late and use the familiar traffic excuse. Or the train was late. Many times they are and many times they are not. This excuse doesn't sound made up because it is based on a specific detail. It is obvious the company told Apple how many the could produce. Though no one can assume there will or won't be manufacturing issues, manufacturers will do things to speed thinsg up. And they will cut corners. Apple has a track history of lying and cutting corners. Apple was sued, because Steve Jobs chose to not use heat-sinks some old Macs. The resulting heat burned the capacitors and Apple charged for the repair. Once buyer filed a lawsuit saying the defect is caused by the fact the boards are gettign to hot and it was report that Steve signed off on having the heat-sinks removed, even though the engineers told him not too. Apple has a history of lying. The chances of this having been made up is much lower than the chances of it being fact. I guess if it gets unlocked with a photo, or the thing completely just doesn't work, then the cutting corners claim will then have a lot of validity behind it. This is gonna bite Apple in the butt.

31. apple-rulz

Posts: 2112; Member since: Dec 27, 2016

The sheer pain and anxiety the iPhone X is causing the anti Apple troll brigade is getting even more entertaining.

33. tedkord

Posts: 17356; Member since: Jun 17, 2009

Yes, our stomachs are sore from laughing so hard.

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