Analyst who broke out Snapdragon 820 specs says Qualcomm's upcoming chip is 50% more powerful than the Samsung Galaxy S6's

Analyst who broke out Snapdragon 820 specs says Qualcomm's upcoming chip is 50% more powerful than the Samsung Galaxy S6's
As year 2015 draws to a conclusion, we're already shifting our sights to what's in store for the first half of next year — mainly a new generation of Android smartphones, powered by Qualcomm's up and coming Snapdragon 820 SoC. The US chip maker's next flagship platform is commanding increased industry and user interest, for besides the expected two-fold increase in processing power, it's also meant to deliver in all those stretches where the Snapdragon 810 fell short of achieving the targeted goals. A disappointment after a successful streak of fast and efficient chipsets, this one throttled its speeds quickly and heavily to stop itself from overheating, and sacrificed battery life.

Then again, the controversy did serve to inject additional interest in Qualcomm's upcoming flagship product. And judging by the rumors swirling in the Rumor Grande river, the Snapdragon 820 may have all it takes to bring the company back on the right track. We've already heard of Samsung and TSMC as potential manufacturing partners, and the possibility of the former's Galaxy S7 flagship featuring the latest high-end Qualcomm chipset once again.

Now, Chinese analyst Pan Juitang (the first to uncover details about the chipset that eventually turned out correct) has made the SD 820 seem even more promising in his new report. He claims that Qualcomm's dragonborn chipset is 50% faster than Samsung's own Exynos 7420, the chipset that's been at the heart of this year's premium Galaxy devices. Allegedly, the 820 is up to 50% more powerful in single thread performance, which sounds very promising considering most Android apps do not prioritise multi-threading.

However, Samsung is preparing silicon of similar prowess for next year, the Exynos M1. Most likely, the chipset will end up in upcoming Galaxy devices for the Asian market, while their global variants will run on Qualcomm hardware.

We also get another confirmation of a 14nm FinFET process being used for fabrication, along with Cat 10 LTE support (up to 450Mbps downlink), a "complete 4K60 entertainment system" that would enable 4K video playback at 60 FPS, a programmable pre/post-processing camera DSP (which manufacturers will hopefully take advantage of), and a dedicated low-power sensor for "emerging always-on use-cases". It looks like Qualcomm is bringing some serious top shelf technology of its own along with the powerful chipset, so let's have our fingers crossed for this one!

Android smartphone makers are already taking test samples of the Snapdragon 820 out for a spin. According to Frank Meng, president of Qualcomm China, there are as many as 30 Snapdragon 820-powered smartphones in their planning and design phases. Meanwhile, we've rounded up some upcoming devices and what we know about them in this article. Check it out and let us know about your expectations!

FEATURED VIDEO

53 Comments

2. Ninetysix

Posts: 2965; Member since: Oct 08, 2012

That's hot.

21. ibend

Posts: 6747; Member since: Sep 30, 2014

i hope not, 810 is hot enough for me

28. Dude2014

Posts: 448; Member since: Feb 12, 2014

I'm an Android guy but I enjoy reading your sarcastic comments. Lol

3. zeeBomb

Posts: 2318; Member since: Aug 14, 2014

Hell yeah it better. Just pray it doesn't become twice as hot however.

61. TSMan2

Posts: 363; Member since: Aug 20, 2015

Of course all the media should wash up the Qualcomm's face now. After the 810 disaster. Qualcomm is US company, but Samsung is not. Samsung must be put down if you are US patriots. No matter how. Remember when Samsung ditched SD810 , how many BS was on the media bashing Samsung? Remember? Well Samsung was right, and that was not good. So let Samsung's bashing start again. BTW , of course Samsung will make better SoC . No doubt

4. Macready

Posts: 1829; Member since: Dec 08, 2014

"Allegedly, the 820 is up to 50% more powerful in single thread performance, which sounds very promising considering most Android apps do not prioritize multi-threading." Interesting how Phonearena keeps repeating this nonsense when 4.5 years ago my old S2 would already employ both cores for practically every app that wasn't idling. Drop that iOS logic and get with the times.

11. o0Exia0o

Posts: 903; Member since: Feb 01, 2013

Multi-thread and multi-core are 2 different and separate things that have nothing to do with one another..... Multi-threading:https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Multithreading_(computer_architecture) Multi-core:https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Multi-core_processor

38. Macready

Posts: 1829; Member since: Dec 08, 2014

The writer was obviously referring to multi core to begin with. See Geekbench 3 for example, which is often quoted for performance increase measurements of single and multi core performance.

42. o0Exia0o

Posts: 903; Member since: Feb 01, 2013

I believe that would be your assumption of the article, but I think you are not correct. I believe the author knew what he was talking about when he referred to the fact that most Android apps don't prioritize multi-threading within a core while an app is running, meaning that at any given moment while an app is running there are wasted resources within said core that are not being utilized therefore affecting performance and slowing the system. The 820 with its 50% better single thread performance should help with system lag...

53. Macready

Posts: 1829; Member since: Dec 08, 2014

Based on previous statements from the author, that would likely be an incorrect assumption. If resources of a single core aren't fully utilized now, it's hard to predict if faster single core performance is much of a help. And it's not the "wasted resources" that cause lag, in the past it was partially the switching between cores, now what's mostly left is phone manufacturer software design choice that can cause lag, not Android.

13. ibend

Posts: 6747; Member since: Sep 30, 2014

theyll continue that logic until iPhone use more than 2 core, lol

30. Techist

Posts: 311; Member since: Jan 27, 2015

Apple's A8X is a triple-core processor, which I am sure Apple wouldn't do use over dual-core processor if there weren't some significant advantages. In fact, there's even a rumor that Apple might sometime soon utilize a hexa-core (6 cores) processor! This whole "single-core performance is all that matters" argument was always no more than a smoke-screen to obscure the fact that more cores do indeed translate to better performance, as Apple found to be the case with the A8X.

62. Plutonium239

Posts: 1239; Member since: Mar 17, 2015

The A9 is a dual core cpu...

68. Shocky unregistered

The A8X was for the iPad and not suitable for phones, they obviously thought the iPad needed more processing power than the A8 powered iPhone 6 so they added an additional CPU core(as well as a few other things) Seems Apple don't think Phone's require as much CPU performance.

71. TechieXP1969

Posts: 14967; Member since: Sep 25, 2013

Well you dont need 3 cores to push a 750 display...do you?

5. hafini_27

Posts: 951; Member since: Oct 31, 2013

I wonder what can we do with all the increasing power? All the speed tests and such only show things like loading games 2 seconds faster.

16. ibend

Posts: 6747; Member since: Sep 30, 2014

i prefer S6 speed with twice battery life than twice benchmark score with similar battery life

6. Ordinary

Posts: 2454; Member since: Apr 23, 2015

"considering most Android apps do not prioritize multi-threading" This myth is getting old.

8. grahaman27

Posts: 364; Member since: Apr 05, 2013

always annoying.

9. bucky

Posts: 3794; Member since: Sep 30, 2009

Still true

20. Ordinary

Posts: 2454; Member since: Apr 23, 2015

72. TechieXP1969

Posts: 14967; Member since: Sep 25, 2013

Even though apps can be written to use multiple threads, it doesn't matter on Android. The applications on Android, doesn't have direct hardware access. All application requests are handled by the Virtual machine. Android is already written to use multiple threads. Thus as long as the OS has access ti all the cores, it will hand the requests of the application and handle it based on the settings of the VM. The biggest flaw of Android is its a VM. If they simply would rewrite Android, so apps can have direct hardware access, we could see just how fast the devices and apps would be. But as long as the VM is handling all app requests, none of that tech stuff matters; other than it proves the Android/Samsung haters wrong.

10. hafini_27

Posts: 951; Member since: Oct 31, 2013

True DAT.

22. Shocky unregistered

This isn't 2005, developers should know how to make the most out of multiple cores by now.

12. cleatglitch

Posts: 165; Member since: May 25, 2013

nowadays it's really not all about apps for me...camera frames per second...audio...it's more for media and inn hardware specs is wat i need

14. Guaire

Posts: 892; Member since: Oct 15, 2014

Actually we don't know most of Android apps core usage. No one bothers to do an extensive study.

31. Guaire

Posts: 892; Member since: Oct 15, 2014

Nope. I was aware of both. Sure those articles killed that Android apps doesn't need more than 3 cores myth created by Qualcomm, but still those are contains small amount of apps.

33. Dude2014

Posts: 448; Member since: Feb 12, 2014

"Most Android apps do not prioritize multi-threading." ~ PA Lol .. It's really funny these PA guys don't even understand basic things about SoC and yet still call themselves professional. Professional my ass. Lmao xD They should stop licking Apple's ass.

Latest Stories

This copy is for your personal, non-commercial use only. You can order presentation-ready copies for distribution to your colleagues, clients or customers at https://www.parsintl.com/phonearena or use the Reprints & Permissions tool that appears at the bottom of each web page. Visit https://www.parsintl.com/ for samples and additional information.