The US may fight planned economy with 5G socialism to counter Huawei

The US may fight planned economy with 5G socialism to counter Huawei
When dealing with socialism do like the socialists, and give your companies government money to push them in the right direction - that seems to be the reasoning behind the Utilizing Strategic Allied Telecommunications Act that a bipartisan group of senators is proposing.

In it, a government sponsorship program for 5G equipment manufacturers, apparently aimed to counter Huawei's value-for-money leadership in the field is detailed. One of the things the US is accusing Huawei in, is receiving state money meant for futureproof industries. The bill is prepping to open taxpayer coffers over exactly the same thing, with money collected for spectrum auctions from the likes of Verizon or AT&T.

More than a $1 billion will be headed towards blocking "Chinese telecom-equipment makers" from getting a foothold in networks around the globe, and we all know which those are. That would be at least $750 million toward US companies developing open 5G standard and the equipment to match, plus a $500 million fund dedicated for those who use "trusted and secure" gear for 5G carrier networks abroad.

Given that the US overslept when it comes to 5G equipment standards and manufacturing, the bill is meant to spearhead the creation of local firms that can be an alternative to Huawei's alternatives like Nokia or Ericsson, in addition to footing the difference bill between their expensive base stations and Huawei's affordable 5G gear to anyone interested.

The National Telecommunications and Information Administration, which is part of the Commerce Department, will be managing the grants that the innovation fund will give for research and development of open-standard 5G. This, in turn, will benefit American companies that would like to enter the field that is now basically circled by the record number of Huawei 5G patents.

The $500 million Multilateral Telecommunications Security Fund, on the other hand, would be managed directly by the State Department, and will be aimed at participating in the creation of international engineering standards, catching up on the ground ceded to Chinese companies there. The "Security Fund" will also directly be giving money to foreign carriers that choose to build their 5G networks with non-Chinese gear, it seems:

  • Require the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) to direct at least $750 million, or up to 5 percent of annual auction proceeds, from new auctioned spectrum licenses to create an O-RAN R&D Fund to spur movement towards open-architecture, software-based wireless technologies, funding innovative, ‘leap-ahead’ technologies in the U.S. mobile broadband market. The fund would be managed by the National Telecommunications and Information Administration (NTIA), with input from the FCC, Defense Advanced Research Project Agency (DARPA), and National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), among others;

  • Create a $500 million Multilateral Telecommunications Security Fund, working with our foreign partners, available for 10 years to accelerate the adoption of trusted and secure equipment globally and to encourage multilateral participation, and require reports for Congress on use of proceeds and progress against goals to ensure ample oversight;

  • Create a transition plan for the purchase of new equipment by carriers that will be forward-compatible with forthcoming O-RAN equipment so small and rural carriers are not left behind;

  • Increase U.S. leadership in International Standards Setting Bodies (ISSBs) by encouraging greater U.S. participation in global and regional telecommunications standards forums and requiring the FCC write a report to Congress with specific recommendations;

  • Expand market opportunities for suppliers and promote economies of scale for equipment and devices by encouraging the FCC to harmonize new commercial spectrum allocations with partners where possible, thus promoting greater alignment with allies and driving down the cost of Huawei alternatives.

A veritable 5G bonanza for all that may still come a bit too little too late but, as Sen. John Cornyn state: "By helping to spur innovations in 5G, we can inoculate ourselves against the threat posed by China and encourage the development of technology that is secure, affordable, and economically beneficial to our allies."

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26 Comments

1. TBomb

Posts: 1707; Member since: Dec 28, 2012

The need for power has to be the worst biological trait of living organisms

2. CrapGame

Posts: 45; Member since: Nov 29, 2019

"By helping to spur innovations in 5G, we can inoculate ourselves against the threat posed by China and encourage the development of technology that is secure, affordable, and economically beneficial to our allies." And allow us, instead of China, to spy on everyone. Lol

3. Bernoulli

Posts: 4364; Member since: Sep 01, 2012

Actually that'll be the Finns, last time I checked Nokia was a Finnish company, not American

4. meanestgenius

Posts: 22804; Member since: May 28, 2014

Bernoulli! How ya doin’? True, Nokia is a Finnish company, but what I’m getting from this is that the U.S. government wants to use this to spur U.S. companies primarily to build out a 5G network for the U.S. and the world. The U.S. wants to be the leader in 5G networking technology, which, quite frankly, I don’t see ever happening.

8. JMartin22

Posts: 2415; Member since: Apr 30, 2013

When did you become such a Chinese cheerleader? I remember when your post used to be moderate and impartial.

10. meanestgenius

Posts: 22804; Member since: May 28, 2014

When did your reading comprehension skills sink so low? I remember when you used to actually comprehend what people post. I ask that because me favoring a tech company and their products that happens to be owned by people of Chinese nationality while pointing out the BS political propaganda they are in the middle of IS NOT being a “Chinese cheerleader”. READ my comments and actually COMPREHEND what I post. I have NEVER once said anything in favor of or in support of the Chinese government. But I will and do point out the hypocrisy of people thinking the U.S. government is actually when it’s actually not. The Chinese government AND the U.S. government have BOTH committed, and still commit, gross atrocities

12. Venom

Posts: 3973; Member since: Dec 14, 2017

I agree. Glad I'm not the only one who is noticing it lol.

13. meanestgenius

Posts: 22804; Member since: May 28, 2014

Aka like him, you lack reading comprehension when it comes to my comments.

15. Venom

Posts: 3973; Member since: Dec 14, 2017

Not much to comprehend when your comments boil down to "*smooch smooch* Huawei is the bestest being bullied in by propaganda *smooch*"

17. meanestgenius

Posts: 22804; Member since: May 28, 2014

The fact that have now resorted to blowing kisses at me because I exposed your lack of reading comprehension is unsettling, to say the least. I know I'm handsome, but I don't go that way. Sorry, but not sorry to burst your little bubble about that.

7. CrapGame

Posts: 45; Member since: Nov 29, 2019

I didn't know Senator Cornyn was Finnish and representing Helsinki in the US Congress. My apologies.

11. tedkord

Posts: 17512; Member since: Jun 17, 2009

I think you're confused. Sen. Cornyn, like all GOP senators, represents Moscow in the US Congress.

5. meanestgenius

Posts: 22804; Member since: May 28, 2014

“.....towards blocking "Chinese telecom-equipment makers" Translation: “Oh, you’re a telecom equipment maker of Chinese origin? Well then, you must be spying for the Chinese government so we are going to do everything we can to block your advancements, even though we have no evidence of you spying on behalf of the Chinese government.” This sounds dangerously like profiling to me, which is par the course for the U.S. government, and many people in the U.S. as well, especially when dealing with U.S. citizens of African decent. They are literally ASSUMING Chinese telecom companies like Huawei are spying on behalf of the Chinese government....because they are a Chinese company. This is also an attempt to grab power and position so that the U.S. government can be the ones to predominantly spy on you, like they’ve used Cisco to do. For the ones that are lacking in comprehension: My comment is NOT in defense of the Chinese government. None of my comments ever have been. This is ME pointing out the U.S. government’s profiling and attempt to grab power and position so they can more effectively do what they claim Chinese telecom companies are doing on behalf of the Chinese government, which is spying, and they want to use U.S. companies to do it.

14. rossy

Posts: 51; Member since: Aug 23, 2013

Give it a rest with a moral equivalency between Chinese government and the US government. Huawei has no choice but to do what Chinese government tell it to do even when operating in foreign markets. Their action will never be disclosed. Finish or Swedish telecom makers don't have to do the same. The US government spy agencies will have to hack into their equipment which is subject to detection and disclosure.

16. Venom

Posts: 3973; Member since: Dec 14, 2017

I agree. Exactly what I was thinking.

19. meanestgenius

Posts: 22804; Member since: May 28, 2014

You would go against anything I say, even if I said water is wet, so you agreeing with him is of no consequence.

18. meanestgenius

Posts: 22804; Member since: May 28, 2014

Spoken like someone that absolutely approves of the immoral behavior of the U.S. government. And I will continue to call out the hypocrisy of people that support the U.S. government attacking China for doing exactly what the U.S. does, and there is absolutely nothing you can do about it. There is no law that forces Huawei to do what the Chinese government asks, even on foreign soil. Huawei themselves have said this. And what planet are you from? The U.S. government already spies on its own and has backdoors into the equipment of many U.S. companies.

20. rossy

Posts: 51; Member since: Aug 23, 2013

There is absolutely a law that mandates data sharing if CCP asks for it. There is simply no choice in the matter. CCP is communist dictatorship with a semi-marker economy. I have no problem when people criticize the US government collecting call metadata from its citizens. They probably do more egregious things than that and we don't know about it. However, it is absolutely idiotic to say that the US government and CCP are treating its citizens equally, came to power the same way, or equally good. It's like saying the US government and Soviet government were the same during the Cold War.

21. meanestgenius

Posts: 22804; Member since: May 28, 2014

There is absolutely no law that states that Huawei has to create backdoors or turn over data of any of its customers on foreign soil. There is also no law that says that Huawei cannot refuse any requests made, and they’ve gone on record saying that they would refuse any request. https://news.softpedia.com/news/huawei-says-it-won-t-spy-on-users-even-if-it-s-asked-to-525094.shtml The U.S. government is also absolutely as bad as China is, if not worse. This country was founded on thievery, murder and the enslavement of other nationalities and inhumane treatment of other races. It is absolutely idiotic to say or believe otherwise.

22. rossy

Posts: 51; Member since: Aug 23, 2013

If you draw equivalency between CCP authoritarian government and completely controlled judicial system in China and elected US government and independent judiciary, we will never agree on anything. I lived under totalitarian government so I know the difference. You're either blissfully ignorant or a propagandist. Back to the topic, if CCP security apparatus demands action from Huawei, there is no recourse, no appeal. Nobody would even know about the demand. Your reference article is just their statement that says "We will not do it. Trust us". If anyone believes that they can resist the demand, I have a bridge to sell you. Here are some referenceshttps://www.bbc.com/news/world-europe-46851777,https://www.ft.com/content/282f8ca0-3be6-11e9-b72b-2c7f526ca5d0,https://www.cnbc.com/2019/03/05/huawei-would-have-to-give-data-to-china-government-if-asked-experts.html

23. meanestgenius

Posts: 22804; Member since: May 28, 2014

Of course I can draw equivalency to the way the Chinese government treats its citizens to the way the U.S. government treats its citizens of Black and Brown hues. I don’t give a rats scrawny @$$ if some stranger on the internet and I never agree on anything. I live in the U.S. as a person of color, so I know firsthand the gross mistreatment and profiling of my people. It’s YOU that are either blissfully ignorant or it’s your “privilege” that has allowed you to live in denial. Huawei absolutely does not have to comply with the Chinese governments requests to give over data, and there is no law to force them to do so. Incoming links to follow.

26. rossy

Posts: 51; Member since: Aug 23, 2013

You're right I am privileged to live in the US.

27. meanestgenius

Posts: 22804; Member since: May 28, 2014

There is another type of “privileged” that you are as well, lol.

24. meanestgenius

Posts: 22804; Member since: May 28, 2014

25. meanestgenius

Posts: 22804; Member since: May 28, 2014

“There are no laws in China that obligate us to work with the Chinese government with anything whatsoever,” Suffolk said.” That’s from here: https://www.scmp.com/news/china/article/3013936/huawei-not-bound-chinese-spy-laws-companys-cybersecurity-chief-john https://www.androidheadlines.com/2019/02/huawei-china-spying-obligation-chairman-remarks.html As far as the link you provided goes, if you really think that article’s narrative isn’t spun in the U.S. governments favor, then it’s ME that has a bridge to sell to YOU, and I’ll even throw in the water under it for free.

6. electrophage

Posts: 74; Member since: Jun 17, 2011

We'd need 5 years at least to catch up, and neither the world nor the Chinese will wait. Can thank our greedy foolish companies like AT&T and Verizon for worrying more about their stock portfolios than innovation

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