AT&T to spend millions promoting safe texting with "it can wait" campaign

AT&T to spend millions promoting safe texting with "it can wait" campaign
AT&T has started a new campaign to try to get Americans to stop texting while driving. The carrier will spend tens of millions of dollars to promote its "it can wait" initiative and is asking everyone to make a commitment starting September 19th to no longer work their thumbs while working the steering wheel. The nation's second largest carrier wants drivers and supporters to go to the www.itcanwait.com web site to take a no texting and driving pledge and then share their promise with others via Twitter (#itcanwait).

AT&T's goal is to reduce the 100,000 automobile accidents that occur each year with injuries or fatalities due to someone texting while driving. "It can wait" means that any message you need to text, no matter how important it is, can wait until the driver is no longer behind the wheel. No text is worth dying for is AT&T's message and to get the word out, the carrier is willing to spend tens of millions of dollars. AT&T is also having its 240,000 employees take the pledge, and is working with television and music celebrities to get the message across to the public via TV ads, concerts, public appearances, Twitter and Facebook. Speaking of the latter two social networks, AT&T will advertise on them as well as advertising on television during high profile events. An online simulator at the www.itcanwait.com website will allow everyone to experience the danger of texting while driving. The carrier will also bring law enforcement, consumer safety groups and others into the promotion, while asking 1,000 of its suppliers to have their employees pledge not to text and drive.

A recent study done by AT&T shows that 97% of teens knows that texting and driving is dangerous although 75% say it is a common practice amongst their friends. 89% of them expect a reply from an email or text within 5 minutes while 77%  have seen their parents text and drive. The good news is that 89% of teens said an app would be an effective way to get them to stop driving and texting. AT&T's DriveMode app, developed by someone whose life was affected by texting while driving, is now available for Android and BlackBerry smartphones as a solution to the problem. Versions of the app for other platforms will be coming soon.source: AT&T





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