US-based Huawei research blocked from reaching China over security concerns

US-based Huawei research blocked from reaching China over security concerns
The relationship between the US Government and Chinese tech giant Huawei is far from warm. From straight out banning Huawei equipment from being used in the States to pressuring mobile carriers to not sell Huawei smartphones, authorities have put quite an effort to limit the influence of Huawei in North America. The main reason for that is the company’s close ties with the Chinese government and fears that it's sending it communications data from the US.

In the latest episode of this ongoing drama, Huawei’s research-and-development unit based in California has been denied export licenses, the WallStreetJournal reports. The subsidiary is called Futurewei Technologies Inc. and is employing around 700 engineers and scientists in Silicon Valley.

Not all of Futurewei’s products are subject to export licensing, but the ones that are, for example, high-speed data-transfer technology and other telecommunications-related technologies and software, can no longer be sent back to China. The information comes from the US Commerce Department, which informed the company as early as June that its export licenses won’t be renewed once they expire. The Department’s reasoning is national security concerns, plain and simple.

The decision has been contested by Futurewei, but until there’s any change, the export block stays in place. While the technologies in question are only part of Futurewei’s developed products, the company already said in a response to the Commerce Department that if the licensing issue isn't resolved, it will look for alternative locations for its operations, outside of the US.

It seems that soon Huawei might be unable to tap America’s brainpower for its own purposes. Not that surprising seeing how hits from US officials are just another day at the office for the world’s second-largest phone maker.

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21 Comments

1. Agniputra

Posts: 29; Member since: Dec 06, 2018

Huawei deserves this...

2. RebelwithoutaClue

Posts: 5469; Member since: Apr 05, 2013

Why? Have there been any evidence they are sending information home that shouldn't be sent?

3. meanestgenius

Posts: 21030; Member since: May 28, 2014

Your proof that they deserve this? Or are you just another person that believes anything the U.S. says, as if they are the shining example of integrity?

11. sissy246

Posts: 6840; Member since: Mar 04, 2015

I bet he is one that thinks the US is on the up and up.

6. hilih

Posts: 1; Member since: Jan 11, 2019

bikin malu lo, negara sendiri aja pakai Huawei

7. jacky899

Posts: 316; Member since: May 16, 2017

The only surveillance hack ever found in Huawei's equipment to date was ironically implanted by the NSA. Edward Snowden leaked a document in 2012 that show how the NSA's Tailored Access Operations unit conducting covert operation “Shotgiant” beginning in 2007 had succeeded in infiltrating computer servers in Huawei's headquarters in Shenzhen, China by 2010. The success allowed the agency to spy on email communications of Huawei employees, including founder of Huawei, as well as steal the source code for specific Huawei products that could be used to exploit those products for espionage or cyberwarfare purposes. The purpose was to find ties between Huawei and the Chinese gov and also to give NSA the ability to roam through computers and telephone networks of all nations (allied or not) that purchase Huawei equipment to conduct surveillance, and offensive cyberoperations if required.https://www.nytimes.com/2014/03/23/world/asia/nsa-breached-chinese-servers-seen-as-spy-peril.html No evidence of backdoors or Huawei working with the Chinese government were found after a decade of spying and digging into Huawei’s system and devices by a huge NSA taskforce of expert hackers and engineers. This year, Trump administration justified the ban on Huawei products that despite no evidence of backdoors in Huawei products were ever found (besides the NSA installed one), it doesn't mean Huawei will not embed back doors in future products or software updates. To me, I think that is a very weak argument because the Chinese can use the same argument and ban all US products especially given the huge irrefutable list of evidence of NSA spying. In addition to mass surveillance of domestic civilians, Edward Snowden described, "NSA engaged in "dangerous" and "criminal" activity by "hacking" civilian infrastructure networks in other countries such as "universities, hospitals, and private businesses" NSA themselves have claimed to have "direct access" through the "Prism" program to the systems of many major internet companies, including Microsoft, Skype, Apple, Google, Facebook and Yahoo despite some of these companies later deny NSA's claim (for obvious reasons).https://www.theguardian.com/world/2013/ju​l/11/microsoft-nsa-collaboration-user-data The US recently asked Germany to stop using Huawei products and Germany asked for proof of Huawei working with the Chinese government or Huawei spying. The US could not present any.https://fudzilla.com/news/47805-german-watchdog-says-there-is-no-proof-of-huawei-spying

14. mahalo15

Posts: 54; Member since: Nov 30, 2018

Totally agree. Cisco shouldn't had let Huawei off easy after they stole their source code in early 2000's. US companies spend billions of dollars in R&D and they steal it for free. That's the reason Huawei is not even in the top 20 for R&D spend.

15. mootu

Posts: 1271; Member since: Mar 16, 2017

Huawei spent $14 billion in 2017 which puts them in equal 2nd place with google, They are reported to be spending $20 billion in 2019 which would make them the worlds biggest R&D spender. https://www.ft.com/content/7abddaca-33dc-11e8-a3ae-fd3fd4564aa6 Seeing as you want to mention Cisco then how's about 5 new backdoors discovered in Cisco equipment in the first half of 2018. So who's really doing the spying? https://www.tomshardware.com/news/cisco-backdoor-hardcoded-accounts-software,37480.html

16. mahalo15

Posts: 54; Member since: Nov 30, 2018

Huawei is not even in top 20 https://www.statista.com/statistics/265645/ranking-of-the-20-companies-with-the-highest-spending-on-research-and-development/ https://www.recode.net/2018/4/9/17204004/amazon-research-development-rd https://www.strategyand.pwc.com/innovation1000 So Cisco has backdoors and they are evil. Huawei who stole Cisco's source code and implemented it in their own networking equipment and who are flagrant abuser of international sanctions against North Korea and Iran are so pious. You should stop smoking whatever you're smoking cause it obviously is killing your brain cells.

17. jacky899

Posts: 316; Member since: May 16, 2017

The accusation of Huawei stealing Cisco's source code was never hard proven unlike the renowned case where NSA stole Huawei's source code and embedded backdoors to spy on all countries using Huawei equipment. You are completely exaggerating the Huawei/Cisco lawsuit in a smearing campaign against Huawei. If there were hard evidence, Huawei being America's public enemy number 1 would have been fined the world over for it instead of a mere settlement outside of court. Huawei being sued or fined for patent infringment has been far less than the never ending lawsuits between Qualcomm, Apple, Samsung, Nvidia, Intel, etc. E.g., Certain Iphones are being banned from Germany and software required to be updated to remove Qualcom IP in China. Using your logic, wouldn't that make Huawei far less of a theif than these companies? Your accusation is no different from Trump's constant baseless accusation of Huawei/China stealing 5G tech from the US when the whole tech world knows Huawei has been years ahead of the US in 5G tech. You want to understand the truth behind US's propaganda against Huawei, read these articles: https://www.wired.com/2014/03/how-huawei-became-nsa-nightmare/ http://www.spiegel.de/international/world/nsa-spied-on-chinese-government-and-networking-firm-huawei-a-960199.html https://www.washingtonpost.com/business/technology/huaweis-us-competitors-among-those-pushing-for-scrutiny-of-chinese-tech-firm/2012/10/10/b84d8d16-1256-11e2-a16b-2c110031514a_story.html?noredirect=on&utm_term=.40288ae4502d

19. mootu

Posts: 1271; Member since: Mar 16, 2017

"Huawei is not even in top 20" Huawei is not listed in your top 20 lists as they are not a public company, last year they spent the same as Google who are at number 2 on statistics lists. 2019 they will spend $20 billion wich will make them worlds number 1 R&D spender. It's you who needs to quit the smoking.

20. jacky899

Posts: 316; Member since: May 16, 2017

That's a really huge R&D budget for a company that makes MUCH LESS profit than the likes of Google, Apple, Samsung etc. and considering R&D in China is much cheaper. I guess that's the only way to avoid being involved in IP theft lawsuits like Apple, Samsung, Nvidia, Qualcomm, Intel, etc. have been since it will be exaggerated 100x if Huawei is sued (guilty prior to trial by US media followed by court). Sadly, whatever great new tech earned by their diligent effort will be downplayed by Trump fanatics as being stolen from US companies who don't even have that technology.

21. mahalo15

Posts: 54; Member since: Nov 30, 2018

"Huawei is not listed in your top 20 lists as they are not a public company" Exactly, therefore they can say whatever they like without being independently audited. Public companies get scrutinized unlike private one's. BTW, are you member of "50 cent party"?

4. meanestgenius

Posts: 21030; Member since: May 28, 2014

This is getting ridiculous. Politics suck, smh....

5. smoked_2na

Posts: 84; Member since: Mar 15, 2017

There is an office for Huawei Technologies Co Ltd jobs in Framingham, MA which has actively recruited co-workers from the company where I am employed. The office neither supports, sells, engineers or develops products. The office's sole purpose is to collect information. New hires are promised many benefits and at the beginning are asked to sign paperwork not to disclose information from their former employers. Once this paperwork is in a file cabinet they are told to start telling everything they know or they will never see those promised benefits. Once the new employee can no longer keep the pipeline full of information and can't help continue finding other recruits from their former employer they are cast off. This is nothing more than a spy shop and should be closed down.

8. jacky899

Posts: 316; Member since: May 16, 2017

hahaha that is very funny. Collect information on your bathroom and porn habits? If Huawei, which is under EXTREME SURVEILLANCE, really had such a conspicuous spy office in the US, the FBI/CIA/NSA would have made BIG PROPAGANDA out of this. You think Huawei is that stupid or you expect people here to be gullible enough?

9. smoked_2na

Posts: 84; Member since: Mar 15, 2017

If the US, the FBI/CIA/NSA were to contact me ( jacky899), I could give names. This is not BS but the real deal. Stealing intellectual property that is the foundation of your banking, airline, etc infrastructure is not "bathroom and porn habits"!

10. jacky899

Posts: 316; Member since: May 16, 2017

If it was true, you think all those US workers in that office would have just kept silent and not reported the activities to the US gov long ago. They would have freaking recieved a medal of honor for patriotism. It would have been all over the news instead of these fake spying articles with zero evidence presented to date. Huawei has absolutely no political influence or power unlike US corps and gov to silence people here. Also US have hacked into Huawei network and email server and heavily monitored them for all those years. If there were any truth of Huawei stealing intellectual property or info, it would have been bombarding the news headlines.

12. L0n3n1nja

Posts: 1499; Member since: Jul 12, 2016

America has a track record of spying on everyone including allies, it would be kind of funny to see iPhone bans simply because they're American with zero evidence.

13. mahalo15

Posts: 54; Member since: Nov 30, 2018

Huawei has been stealing intellectual property since early 2000's and it's a well know fact that they stole Cisco's source code for their networking equipment.

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