New, high-end 16MP OmniVision camera boasts 4K video recording at silky-smooth 60FPS

New, high-end 16MP OmniVision camera boasts 4K video recording at silky-smooth 60FPS

When it comes to mobile photography, we often talk as if the cameras of various smartphones are profoundly different across the maker spectrum. And they usually are — just not on the hardware level. See, there's a pretty high chance that your smartphone is packing a Sony-made Exmor sensor, as the Japanese corporation is the unmatched leader in the field and the preferred partner when talking high-end devices. According to some estimates, Sony accounts for over 40% of all sales. But what about the rest? It's a split between California-based OmniVision (~16%), Samsung (~15%), and other, smaller players.

As a runner-up to the title, OmniVision is likely a name that only dedicated readers among you will have heard of. But that's not for lack of trying on the company's part. In fact, just now, we received word from OmniVision that they have a new, exciting high-end sensor that is already available for sampling. Let's talk specs.

Dubbed the OV16860, we're looking at a relatively large, 1/2.4" sensor with dimensions of 10.5 x 10.5mm and height of 5.8 mm, making it suitable for use in most smartphones. The sensor packs 16 megapixels, meaning a pixel size of 1.3 microns, which is more than quite a few cameras can say, and ensures more light will enter the stack, allowing for better low-light performance and image vibrancy, and less pixel crosstalk (which essentially messes up the color produced by the sensor). There's also support for phase detection auto focus, HDR, and slow-motion video.

Most excitingly, however, the sensor is the first that we know of to be capable of recording 4K UHD (3840 x 2160) video at the whopping 60 frames per second. Since we only know of the just-announced Qualcomm Snapdragon 820 being capable of pushing that kind of information, it might be a while longer until we see this bad boy in a commercially-available smartphone. Still, if for some reason you want silky-smooth, ultra-high definition video, very soon you'll have an extremely affordable alternative, at least in comparison to even consumer class camcorders that currently cost in the thousands of dollars. 

source: PR NewswireWSJ


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22 Comments

1. sergiobr

Posts: 718; Member since: Feb 25, 2013

1/2.4" sensor ? No thx ! We're going to the opposite direction ... larger sensors. But 4K 60fps woo, welcome !

2. Chris.P

Posts: 567; Member since: Jun 27, 2013

1/2.4" is plenty large relative to the mean right now. The Galaxy S6's, for example, is a 1/2.6" unit.

5. abdoualgeria

Posts: 928; Member since: Jul 27, 2015

The new BRITECELL from sammy is 1/2"

6. sergiobr

Posts: 718; Member since: Feb 25, 2013

LG G5 is 1/2", Nokia 808 is 1/1.5" , DMC-CM1 1"

12. Ashoaib

Posts: 3260; Member since: Nov 15, 2013

my nokia 808 is having a 1/1.2'' sensor... may be you have an inferior version of nokia 808

13. DarkStar286

Posts: 229; Member since: Mar 18, 2014

Indeed, it's the 1020 that has the 1/1.5" sensor.

16. sergiobr

Posts: 718; Member since: Feb 25, 2013

I love both ! I had 808 and now just 1020 just to photos. Big sensors are much better

15. sergiobr

Posts: 718; Member since: Feb 25, 2013

Sorry you're correct my 808 is 1/1.2'' sensor.

7. zeeBomb

Posts: 2318; Member since: Aug 14, 2014

Damn this is a STACKED Sensor! 2.4, and 4k @ 60fps...if y'all dont like it then idk what's up with you.

8. zeeBomb

Posts: 2318; Member since: Aug 14, 2014

Big OEMS like HTC and Oneplus should notice these...they nice! Omnivision pulling all the right moves!

14. DarkStar286

Posts: 229; Member since: Mar 18, 2014

Personally I don't think much of it because it's such a small sensor compared to what I've had in my last 3 phones. When it comes to sensors size is king, you can't change the laws of physics!

17. marorun

Posts: 5029; Member since: Mar 30, 2015

So a bigger sensor from 10 year ago would beat a smaller from today? Come on there is a limit to what size can do as some Women say size dont always matter :P

22. DarkStar286

Posts: 229; Member since: Mar 18, 2014

Well a bigger sensor from 3 years ago still beats anything on the market today. Technology has moved on making smaller sensors from effective, but you can't change the laws of physics. Assuming other variables are the same a bigger sensor will always outperform a smaller one, there's no getting around that. If there is a limit on what size can do, how come high end DSLRs use a massive full-frame sensor?

3. byazatt

Posts: 316; Member since: Oct 26, 2012

Now this is news. 2016 you're welcome

4. DoggyDangerous

Posts: 1028; Member since: Aug 28, 2015

Good move from omni vision. Now plz release 10mp 1/2.3 inch sensor with 2 micron pixel size

20. UglyFrank

Posts: 2188; Member since: Jan 23, 2014

You are asking them to break the laws of physics, that would be a 1.67 micron sensor

21. DoggyDangerous

Posts: 1028; Member since: Aug 28, 2015

No problem. Plz release 10mp sensor with 1.67 micron pixel size

9. zeeBomb

Posts: 2318; Member since: Aug 14, 2014

Reminds me of what the IMX 230 dished out too...

10. Genza

Posts: 576; Member since: Mar 12, 2014

To bad that the Qualcomm chipset in the latest Nexus devices can't do 4K @60fps because the image sensor IMX377 is already able to record 4K @60fps.

11. zeeBomb

Posts: 2318; Member since: Aug 14, 2014

If only Google waited it out...#wasted potential

19. George_Ultron

Posts: 9; Member since: Sep 01, 2015

Indeed IMX377 sensor is capable to record at 4k @60 fps

18. George_Ultron

Posts: 9; Member since: Sep 01, 2015

IMX377 -sensor on Huawei Nexus 6P High Speed - Still image ( 4000 X 3000 ) 35 fps@12-bit, 40 fps@-10bit - 4k2k 60 fps ( recording/encoding 4k at 60 fps )

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