Company designing app for Apple Watch that graphs users blood glucose levels


Diabetics who are insulin dependent have to constantly monitor their blood glucose. That requires using a lancet to draw blood, a painful process as it requires pricking one's finger constantly. But a company called DexCom is working on an app for the Apple Watch that will display the user's blood glucose level and graph it every five minutes without requiring finger pricks. The app is expected to be ready for the Apple Watch launch in April. DexCom had already received approval last month for its Apple iPhone app.

If DexCom can perfect its app, it might help draw a large contingent of diabetics to the Apple Watch. Insulin dependent diabetics pay through their noses for glucometer test strips. The app works with a glucose monitor embedded inside the Watch itself that uses a sensor the width of a human hair. The sensor is placed under the skin to come up with blood glucose levels every five minutes.

The FDA has relaxed the regulatory noose around such products. Originally, both the monitor and any associated sofware was considered a Class III device meaning that the agency would give these products the highest degree of scrutiny. Now, only the actual monitor requires Class III approval. The software that allows the readings to be displayed on a smartwatch or another kind of mobile device only needs to be registered with the FDA. This means that the manufacturer needs to make sure that its Apple Watch app meets FDA requirements, but won't have to be tested before coming to market. The glucose monitor inside the watch will still have to meet Class III scrutiny.

source: WSJ

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4 Comments

1. sprockkets

Posts: 1612; Member since: Jan 16, 2012

"The app works with a glucose monitor embedded inside the Watch itself that uses a sensor the width of a human hair. The sensor is placed under the skin to come up with blood glucose levels every five minutes." This is incorrect. The sensor underneath the skin goes to a transmitter, and that device utilizes BLE to send data over to the iphone or their current device. There is nothing apple watch specific about it. As of this past Jan they finally got FDA approval to send the data directly to an iphone. SO FAR nothing is in the apple watch that can monitor glucose stuff.

3. RebelwithoutaClue unregistered

From what I gather, normally the sensor would send data to a separate monitor device (the receiver) and instead of a separate device, it sends the data to the monitor app running on the iWatch. So users would have to carry around one less device (http://www.dexcom.com/continuous-glucose-monitori​ng) Also I am worried about battery life, what will the impact be on the iWatch, since its battery life isn't really remarkable.

2. thegeneral7010

Posts: 437; Member since: Dec 10, 2014

now apple is following samsung's stay fit programms

4. LanceDavis

Posts: 10; Member since: Jul 16, 2012

The watch will not check blood glucose levels. It will get a signal from the CGM the user is already wearing which already talks to their pump. So they will now have the info on their watch or their pump. A watch that is a CGM that is made by Apple would be as much as DexCom's pump!

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