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Nielsen survey claims most users are anxious about location-tracking apps

Posted: , by Alex I.

Nielsen survey claims most users are anxious about location-tracking apps
Ah, privacy. We live in a day and age when our right of privacy may be easily invaded - be it from the CCTVs on the streets or because some smart hackers are doing their things for the odd dollar or two.

A Nielsen study on the subject shows that the majority of the mobile users who were asked whether they are concerned about their privacy when using location-based services and check-in apps answered positive - the exact figures show that 59% of the ladies and 52% of the gents claimed they are anxious about such apps.

The contrast couldn't be clearer as only 12% of the men surveyed and 8% of the women told Nielsen they are "not concerned" and that this is a non-issue for them, while the rest said they were "indifferent".

It's worth noting that all participants in this study were active mobile users (albeit to a different degree), i.e. all of them have downloaded at least one app in the past month.

Do you fear that Big Brother may be watching you, or that, simply put, the apps that are tracking location may cause you headaches?

via: All Things Digital
Nielsen survey claims most users are anxious about location-tracking apps

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posted on 21 Apr 2011, 11:29 1

1. SuperAndroidEvo (Posts: 3521; Member since: 15 Apr 2011)


Well naturally the females would be concerned. If I was a woman and I had a crazy ex & all he would need is to grab my iPhone or go to my PC and get my history to ambush me, yes that would be a concern. I as a man don't want that to happen to me or anyone I know. Privacy is an issue that seems to be slipping through the cracks. It's so easy to find someone now that it's scary. As a child growing up I remember telling my Mom I would be home by sun down. She had no clue where I was. She said in case of an emergency if you need me call collect from a payphone. That is how it was then, now payphones almost don't exist!

posted on 21 Apr 2011, 11:46

2. an (unregistered)


iphone users of both sexes won't even need to know which apps are tracking them coz its apple themselves who is doing that

posted on 21 Apr 2011, 13:10 2

3. Owlet (Posts: 445; Member since: 21 Feb 2011)


Google is doing it too. I just hate the fact and there's nothing can be done. Except to stop using this wonderful gadgets and apps, of course. I usually prefer not to think about this stuff.

posted on 21 Apr 2011, 13:50

4. 530gemini (Posts: 2198; Member since: 09 Sep 2010)


Goodness. This article is not even about any particular OS, and it's already starting to be an OS war. Come on people. Set aside your OS preferences for now, and for once, share an unbiased opinion. I think this is a serious matter that everyone needs to consider.

As for me, I have nothing to hide, but it does not mean I do not value my privacy or safety anymore. I think it's great that there's tracking technology easily available for users. A lot of good can come out of it, but at the same time, it can also be used by bad people with bad intentions.

Safety measures need to be taken by carriers and phonemakers to assure that users location data are securely kept out of reach by just anyone. Government should protect citizens even from law enforcement in acquiring users' data unless authorized to do so under stringent criteria. Most importantly, users are ultimately responsible in the safekeeping of their data. Be careful not to lose your devices, or, make sure your devices are password protected and can be remotely wiped out if lost, especially if you're the kind who keeps a lot of personal data in your devices.

posted on 21 Apr 2011, 16:20

5. Owlet (Posts: 445; Member since: 21 Feb 2011)


There is no OS war so far. Just make sure we'll keep it that way.

posted on 21 Apr 2011, 18:13

8. AppleFUD (unregistered)


Iphone is gay. Just like me!

posted on 21 Apr 2011, 16:31

6. SPcamert (Posts: 56; Member since: 06 Feb 2010)


The thing with all of this is that with most of these tracking issues there is a service being offered in exchange for this information. In the case of Android at least if you want to use Google Maps (and Maps Navigation and anything else location related) you have to let Google keep track of where you are. Now, for a product that completely replaces the need for me to buy a standalone GPS, that automatically updates itself, and that comes with everything else that an android phone comes with, I'd say letting Google know where their users are (so they know where to concentrate their advertising and new services) is a pretty fair trade for a service like that. And honestly, that I'm aware of, I'm not going anywhere that I don't want to be found. But really, if you don't want to be found that badly, don't take your phone (or iPad, or Tablet, or GPS device, or whatever).

I think really the only reason people are upset about this is that Apple put it in without anyone knowing and didn't give them (the illusion of) choice. If they just put a little thing on the activation screen that said in big letters "We're going to track the device and you can't stop it" and didn't let you activate it without clicking "Yes" I don't think anyone would really care that much.

posted on 21 Apr 2011, 17:02

7. 530gemini (Posts: 2198; Member since: 09 Sep 2010)


But there is. Every time you download an app from the app store with tracking abilities, it does pop up a message that says "do you want us to user your current location?". So the user does have a choice.

There's a misunderstanding here. The issue is not whether or not it can be turned off. The issue is Apple DEFAULTING location services to "on" out of the box, and not purging location history. Which users really don't have an issue with, and there's no reported problem about it, neither was there any data that slipped out. This is nothing more than an identified bug or an overlooked step. But of course there's potential for issues in the future, so it's good that it has been brought up so Apple can fix it.

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