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Adobe might stop work on its mobile Flash player, nixes 750 jobs too

Posted: , by Daniel P.

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Adobe might stop work on its mobile Flash player, nixes 750 jobs too
Now that would be a sad day for democracy - sources "close to Adobe" have revealed that the company might stop its development of the mobile Flash player we all know and love on our Android devices, and the BlackBerry PlayBook

We don't know yet if that will affect the latest release that was expected to boost performance multiple times introducing a hardware-accelerated component called Stage 3D, because after the desktop version, Stage 3D was supposed to show up in Android Market, and never materialized. 

The sources have sent a statement, which Adobe is expected to post officially today, and it seems that the company will be focusing more on Adobe AIR and native apps done with it, as well as HTML5 work, rather than develop the Flash player further. 

Our future work with Flash on mobile devices will be focused on enabling Flash developers to package native apps with Adobe AIR for all the major app stores. We will no longer adapt Flash Player for mobile devices to new browser, OS version or device configurations. Some of our source code licensees may opt to continue working on and releasing their own implementations. We will continue to support the current Android and PlayBook configurations with critical bug fixes and security updates.


Well, it was fun while it lasted, and even if the player stays in its current state, it should be still good to bear the transitional period in which everyone moves on to HTML5.

This might have been forced by cost-cutting initiatives, since we doubt Adobe earns much from its mobile Flash player but development hassles. The company said that it will let 750 people go during the restructuring, focusing on digital media and marketing. Music to our ears was the announcement that it will deepen the development of "touch-based" apps for tablets, which means that excellent Photoshop-on-a-tablet demo it showed won't go to waste. 

Adobe expects this restructuring to cost it up to $94 million, mainly for severance pay. The company will be briefing financial analysts on the decision today, so stay tuned for more news from the Adobe camp.

source: Adobe & ZDNet

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posted on 09 Nov 2011, 02:15 3

1. Paden (Posts: 262; Member since: 07 Jul 2011)


This is absolutely huge. Hopefully this is a step away from flash for all platforms.

posted on 09 Nov 2011, 02:15 6

2. taco50 (banned) (Posts: 5506; Member since: 08 Oct 2009)


Looks like Steve Jobs was right. Mobile flash was DOA

posted on 09 Nov 2011, 02:57 3

6. Sniggly (Posts: 6695; Member since: 05 Dec 2009)


We'll see what the actual implications of this are, considering that there are different versions of Flash; there's the full Flash that works on desktops and phones, and there's the Flash Lite that only works on phones.

Since most Android phones are at version 2.2 and above, and no one is really selling Eclair or below phones anymore, the biggest market for mobile Flash has dried up.

posted on 09 Nov 2011, 08:52 2

15. remixfa (Posts: 13902; Member since: 19 Dec 2008)


"We will continue to support the current Android and PlayBook configurations with critical bug fixes and security updates."

Flash isnt dead, its just not getting further development. Honestly, it works pretty flawless as it is. You will never understand how much internet you are missing, taco.

We all know eventually HTML5 will replace flash, but that point is still a long long way off. The bulk of smartphones are flash enabled (yes, android is almost the majority as well), most web sites are flash first over HTML5, and the desktop version of flash is still supported and developed. Unless Android drops flash support (which i doubt that will happen in the next dozen years), mobile flash will never be dead... and it will always be on the majority of smartphones once android passes the 51% marketshare mark.. which it looks like it will do in the next year or 2.


Dont start having your "SJ was right" cake just yet.

posted on 09 Nov 2011, 02:26 1

3. ardent1 (Posts: 1991; Member since: 16 Apr 2011)


That's correct -- Flash was made for PC's involving a mouse.

posted on 09 Nov 2011, 02:38 2

4. drahmad (Posts: 478; Member since: 20 Aug 2011)


i think by mobile version he meant "flashlite". Because flashplayer for androidis a great hit.

posted on 09 Nov 2011, 02:38

5. drahmad (Posts: 478; Member since: 20 Aug 2011)


*android is*

posted on 09 Nov 2011, 02:57 1

7. SlimSoulja86 (Posts: 642; Member since: 03 Nov 2011)


Ther goes iFans {they will attack}

posted on 09 Nov 2011, 03:13 3

8. The_Miz (Posts: 1496; Member since: 06 Apr 2011)


Lol, DoA. Flash is absolutely horrible on a mobile device. People using it as a pro for Android phones having never really talk about the problems.

posted on 09 Nov 2011, 03:34 2

9. Sniggly (Posts: 6695; Member since: 05 Dec 2009)


Problems? Like what?

posted on 09 Nov 2011, 12:15 1

18. The_Miz (Posts: 1496; Member since: 06 Apr 2011)


Security issues, lag, unresponsiveness, forced closing, etc. I know these are typical Android problems, but Flash tends to make things worst.

posted on 09 Nov 2011, 08:21 2

13. iamcc (Posts: 1319; Member since: 07 Oct 2011)


Um, I probably spend a good hour or two a day reading the news whether its online on my tablet or using .the news 360 app and I watch plenty of flash videos with no problem ...

posted on 09 Nov 2011, 12:15 1

19. The_Miz (Posts: 1496; Member since: 06 Apr 2011)


Sure you can.

posted on 09 Nov 2011, 08:39 2

14. lpratas (Posts: 91; Member since: 09 Nov 2011)


In Android phones like Galaxy S II it's smooth and fluid even in full HD. I don't see any problems of the Adobe Flash player make part of the Android browsers in phones like this. In future phones with the innovations of hardware like Qualcomm Krait, Nvidia Kal-El, Exynos 4212, among others, still will may be better.

posted on 09 Nov 2011, 08:53 2

16. remixfa (Posts: 13902; Member since: 19 Dec 2008)


which problem with that? all the problems you speak of were early on with flash on android. flash for android has worked flawlessly for quite some time.

posted on 09 Nov 2011, 12:27

20. Paden (Posts: 262; Member since: 07 Jul 2011)


I gotta say, in 2009 Flash may have been not so hot.... But now? It's great on Android devices.

posted on 09 Nov 2011, 04:56

10. GJanee (Posts: 204; Member since: 29 Jun 2011)


so in the end it came down to the point that many of us stated already a long ago: flash for smartphones is a nogo. at least developers will focus more on html5 from now on.

posted on 09 Nov 2011, 05:59 1

11. lpratas (Posts: 91; Member since: 09 Nov 2011)


I think that is the biggest stupidity that Adobe make. Now that the Android Smartphones started to have powerful hardware they take this stupid decision. Then what is the advantage of have a dual core phone or quad core phone with graphic acceleration and 1GB or more of ram? Is that, they don't even think to consider ending the support. Because the millions of Android users go to reclaim. It's the thing most absurd that i read today.

posted on 09 Nov 2011, 06:24

12. CX3NT3_713 (Posts: 1644; Member since: 18 Apr 2011)


No more flash on future phone's? ? Lol damn j just switched to android ..

posted on 09 Nov 2011, 08:55 1

17. remixfa (Posts: 13902; Member since: 19 Dec 2008)


no, it said it wont support NEW platforms, but will continue to support current ones. Android will have flash for probably a long time to come until Adobe themselves pulls flash off the market.. which i doubt will happen. Android is the largest mobile OS and is dangerously close to taking "majority" status as it approaches 51% of the market.

In that sense, mobile flash is stronger than ever.. with or without "new features" or OSs

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