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Production of the Asus Eee Pad Transformer is now limited to 10,000 units a month

Posted: , by John V.

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Production of the Asus Eee Pad Transformer is now limited to 10,000 units a month
Continuing to take the Android tablet scene by storm, there’s no arguing that the Asus Eee Pad Transformer has somewhat transcended over the competition in one easy step thanks to its unique convertible design and low cost of ownership. Although there were promises to see its production increased, we’re now hearing word that it might be scaled back tremendously compared to what was previously hinted.

Still trying to keep up with consumer demand, Asus is doing whatever they can at this point to satisfy the growing appetite of consumers all around with their surprisingly successful Asus Eee Pad Transformer. However, it now appears as though production will be limited to only 10,000 units a month – compared to the 300,000 that was reported to happen previously.

Apparently, the Taiwanese based company is running into issues trying to source the supplies required to manufacture the tablet and keyboard combination. In the near term, we can expect to see only limited quantities of the tablet, but production will increase dramatically in June.

Therefore, you should consider yourself extremely lucky if you happened to scoop up a unit by now. For the rest of us though, we can only drool and envy those who are flaunting the tablet.

source: Netbook News (translated) via Engadget

10 Comments
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posted on 03 May 2011, 11:58

1. AndroidTroll (Posts: 359; Member since: 05 Mar 2011)


It's not surprising that it's a huge success, it's a great value and a good brand!

posted on 03 May 2011, 14:00

2. protozeloz (Posts: 5378; Member since: 16 Sep 2010)


there is actually a shortage in parts with all that has occured

posted on 03 May 2011, 22:29 1

7. Lucas777 (Posts: 2137; Member since: 06 Jan 2011)


i think asus is just bsing us to make us want it more... honestly samsung and appple have no problem making millions if their own tablets... why cant asus do the same

posted on 04 May 2011, 07:53

9. protozeloz (Posts: 5378; Member since: 16 Sep 2010)


dont think so, people are most likely to get mad and get something else when they have to wait too much

posted on 04 May 2011, 17:09

10. Lucas777 (Posts: 2137; Member since: 06 Jan 2011)


i guess ur right... only big name brands can do that i suppose... like verizon... and other compainies that stall... even the iphone thats white and everybody wants for some reason...

posted on 03 May 2011, 15:41

3. simplyj (Posts: 404; Member since: 23 Dec 2009)


This tablet would appeal to me if it had Windows on it. It's a beautiful tablet and a great dock to go with it.

posted on 03 May 2011, 18:32

4. protozeloz (Posts: 5378; Member since: 16 Sep 2010)


the only problem with windows is the battery. since windows OS was developed to work on constant power source

posted on 06 May 2011, 12:38

12. simplyj (Posts: 404; Member since: 23 Dec 2009)


I think Windows 8 is going to be OS the that changes that. I'll be more than happy to buy one like that.

posted on 04 May 2011, 05:26

8. daniel_bargs (Posts: 323; Member since: 27 Nov 2010)


i aint wrong with the thing in my mind: japan is still the leader in technology and almost all chipsets, displays, name it all, that is needed to make our precious gadgets. if i were you, id better buy japanese products as our way to help them recover.

posted on 05 May 2011, 13:06

11. Dave (unregistered)


Word on the street is that Apple used part of its $60B surplus and tied up production of key tablet parts to hamstring competition in exactly this way. Considering such a move violates anti-trust laws( even if your name is Jobs) one should ask why they are getting a free ride on illegal moves such as that...

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