x PhoneArena is hiring! Reviewer in the USA

LG Voyager Review

LG Voyager

Posted: , posted by PhoneArena Team

Tags:

Pages
Messaging:

Like most other phones in the market today, the Voyager is capable of sending and receiving text, picture, and video messages. The two ways of typing in a text message are by using T9 or multi-tap with the external touch screen, which shows letters on a 12-icon dial pad, or by using the internal QWERTY keypad. . One noticeable improvement over the enV is that the Inbox can now store up to 200 messages instead of just 50.

Messaging - LG Voyager Review
Messaging - LG Voyager Review
Messaging - LG Voyager Review
Messaging - LG Voyager Review
The Voyager comes with a program called Mobile Email so that you can connect with your own personal E-Mail accounts while on the go. However, unlike smartphones that automatically check for new messages every few minutes, the program on the Voyager must be run manually to check for new messages. It comes preloaded with the ability to connect to Yahoo Mail, Windows Live Mail, AOL, AIM, and Verizon.net, but you can also manually configure it to connect to any other E-Mail account through means of POP or IMAP. We were able to access all of our E-Mail accounts without any problems, and could send messages through the account server. When viewing a new message, you can choose not to delete it from the server , so that you can download it later when you are connected using a PC. Even though this application is not as feature-rich as Windows Mobile Outlook, it does a fairly good job for showing plain-text E-Mails. However, it cannot open attachments or render HTML messages , which is a disappointment since the Voyager is targeted as a messaging device. Regardless of the limitations, it is still worth the $5/month access fee.

For people who like to use Instant Messaging, the Voyager also comes with Mobile IM, which will connect you to AIM, Windows Live Messenger, and Yahoo. After signing in, you and can send and receive IMs, but it is basically glorified text messaging to people on your buddy list and will count on your calling plan the same as using text messages.


Connectivity and Data:

The Voyager is a dual band all-digital device that operates on the 800MHz and 1900MHz CDMA Verizon Wireless network. Non-voice data, such as Web and E-mail, are transmitted using the 3G EVDO network, but it is limited to EVDO Rev 0 speeds instead of the faster Rev A. For Mobile TV service, the Voyager uses the 700MHz spectrum on Qualcomm’s MediaFLO network.

Bluetooth version 1.2 is supported and allows up to 20 pairings. Supported profiles include: headset, hands free, dial up networking, A2DP advanced audio distribution (stereo), AVRC, phone book access, object push for vCard and vCalendar, file transfer, human interface, and basic imaging. We were able to use the auto pair feature to easily connect to our Jabra 250v and Motorola HT820 headsets. When using the 250v for calls, we were able to get up to 25 feet of static free performance, and with the HT820 we were able to get up to 30 feet of stereo music without static.

LG Voyager Review
LG Voyager Review
LG Voyager Review
LG Voyager Review
LG Voyager Review
LG Voyager Review
LG Voyager Review
LG Voyager Review
For connecting to the Internet, the Voyager must use Verizon’s EVDO network, since it does not have built in WiFi capabilities. This is no surprise to us, since Verizon currently only allows WiFi on its smartphone devices. When launching the browser, you are taken the VZW Home Page, which has quick launch icons for News, Sports, Weather, Entertainment, Optimized Web, Connect, My Account, and Help. Along the bottom are icons for Zoom in/out, Go to WWW, and Menu. Since the Voyager is the first non-pda/smartphone to incorporate an HTML browser instead of the more traditional WAP, we were interested in going to normal web site to see how it would work. When selecting “Go to WWW” you can view HTML web sites as they would appear on your PC, with properly rendered text, pictures, and formatting, but there is a lot of horizontal and vertical scrolling that must be done. You can zoom out, by pressing the magnifying glass icon located at the bottom of the screen, which will cut down on some scrolling since more of the page is shown at the same time, or you can go to Menu/Display Rendering and select Screen Optimized, which will reformat the page to only allow for vertical scrolling. We then went back to the home page and tried the Optimized Web option. This completely reformats web sites and partitions them into smaller pages. You have to click through 6 or more of these pages to view one actual HTML page. After we used this for a while, we decided to revert back to the standard non-optimized view, where HTML pages are displayed as intended. We started off by using our finger to move through web sites and to click on hypertext links, but after a few minutes we started to discover that navigating the web on the Voyager can be problematic. To begin with, when using your finger to move web sites around on the screen, the page doesn’t move smoothly, and often times would move erratically. For selecting text links, most are shown quite small, causing us to zoom in 150-200% to be able to click the link with our finger. After about an hour, we decided to try navigating through sites by using a stylus that came with the Samsung i760. We imminently noticed that pages were much easier to navigate, and selecting links were no longer a problem. We also turned the Thumbnail mode to Auto, so that a small thumbnail of the page would automatically be shown when scrolling horizontally or vertically. Despite the browser supporting HTML and JavaScript , it does not support any type of plug-ins, such as Flash, which means you cannot watch videos using the popular www.youtube.com site. We were however able to watch videos on the mobile version http://m.youtube.com but they were problematic and often would only play the first 30 seconds . After that, the video would pause, and would take us back to the Mobile YouTube page. We are unsure if this problem is related directly to the web site or to the phone. Regardless, it is a major disappointment that streaming videos from www.youtube.com cannot be viewed.

The time required for the browser to completely load graphically rich sites, such as PhoneArena.com, is 50 seconds, while more simplistic sites, such as Google, would only take up to 6 seconds. While the speed is not excessively bad, the Voyager should have been EVDO Rev A compatible to allow for faster downloads. We sincerely hope that LG incorporates this into the next version of this phone. We also recommend using a stylus if you are planning on using this device for heavy web surfing, as it greatly increases touch-screen accuracy.


Computer Sync:

The Voyager comes with a USB data cable and music manager CD. Going into the Settings & Tools menu, there is an option for USB Auto Detection (Sync Music, Sync Data, Ask on Plug). When selecting “Ask on Plug”, each time your PC is connected to the Voyager, the screen will ask if you want to sync music or data. If you select “Sync Music” the phone shows up on your PC as an external music device, where you can copy music files directly to the phone’s internal memory and microSD card. However, if you select “Sync Data”, then go to Tools and USB Mass Storage, the microSD card is shown as a Removable Storage device, where you can copy pictures, videos and music files. This is by far the easiest method, eliminating the need to remove the memory card and place it into a SD card reader. Our only complaint is that the Voyager uses a proprietary data port, which means if you don’t have the cable with you, you cannot connect the phone to a PC. A better choice would be a miniUSB port, since those cables are easier to come by.

25 Comments
  • Options
    Close





Want to comment? Please login or register.

PhoneArena rating:
8Good
Display2.8 inches, 400 x 240 pixels (166 ppi) TFT
Camera2 megapixels
Size4.64 x 2.12 x 0.71 inches
(118 x 54 x 18 mm)
4.69 oz  (133 g)
Battery950 mAh, 4 hours talk time

Latest stories