HTC Radar Review

Interface:

Windows Phone 7.5 brings Microsoft’s aesthetically unified OS to the next level, taking the visual flare of old and adding some much needed function. These elements include copy/paste, multi-tasking and deeper social-networking integration amongst others.

At the core of the OS are still your two primary screens: homescreen and applications. The homescreen consists of live tiles which act as both shortcuts to apps and app specific notifications. Slide the homescreen out of the way to reveal a list of applications on the right. All these can be pinned to the start menu with a long press, or just opened from the list. In Windows Phone 7.5, a long press of the back button activates a multi-tasking pane with cards that can be swiped through, each representing an open app frozen in its most recent state.


HTC have also included a revised version of their HTC Hub on their Mango lineup. This resonates closely with HTC Sense, with the standard flip-clock weather widget taking center stage. A swipe to the right and you are taken to stocks, another swipe delivers news and finally, a third swipe identifies featured HTC Mango apps which include Photo Enhancer, HTC Connected Media, HTC Location, Dock Mode, Notes and Flashlight.


As a phone, the HTC Radar also works well, with a comfortable dialer sporting big, responsive keys. Type a number in and there is a save button underneath the dialer. It's all very easy and intuitive. The phone book falls under the people tile. This offers very tight integration with Facebook, with a right swipe from your contact list taking you to friend's recent updates. The search capacitive button adapts its function depending on which menu you're in, so contacts can either be scrolled through or searched for directly as expected. Long press the Windows capacitive button to activate the voice dialer.



The copy/paste function works very well, with a single tap highlighting a word and a long press bringing up a cursor. Once an item is on your clipboard, a paste icon appears above the keyboard. On the 3.8” display the keyboard otherwise performs identically to that found on the HTC Mozart/Trophy which is luckily very well indeed. That said, an extra couple of inches would have been appreciated. The email client works great. As soon as you've entered your account details, your emails start to populate and can be read in full HTML glory and now, thanks to Mango, in threaded message view.


Organizer features include alarms, calculator, calendar and notes. The calendar is the most finger friendly we've used in a while, looking very clean and feeling really intuitive. Adding appointments is simple, with the whole experience delivering a clean, visual pleasure. There is also deeper Twitter integration in Mango, making sharing photos and keeping on top of tweets even easier.




Internet and Connectivity:

The HTC 7 Radar is a quad-band GSM, dual-band 3G phone loaded with Wi-Fi, Bluetooth and GPS on board. Connections include a 3.5mm headphone jack, a microUSB port and there’s 8GB of memory as well. With Mango also comes the addition of a front facing VGA camera for video calling and HTC's Connected Media DLNA service.

Completely in line with the latest and greatest achievements in the area, the new Internet Explorer delivers fast loading times and silky smooth scrolling. The same goes for zooming, which you can do by either double-tapping or using pinch-to-zoom. Both options work flawlessly. In addition, the HTC 7 Mozart’s 3.7-inch screen offers a great trade-off between pocketability and web browsability.


Internet Explorer lacks Flash support, however the remainder of the web browsing experience operates well.

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