Samsung Galaxy S9 with Exynos chip has surprisingly bad battery life, here is why

The Samsung Galaxy S9 battery life is... well, not great. But it seems that not all Galaxy S9 phones have the same battery life and an interesting investigation reveals what could be causing those battery issues...
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90 Comments

1. Ellio74

Posts: 74; Member since: Mar 22, 2018

That's again a proof of poor manufacturing from Samsung... After batteries, it shows with their SOCs. It's not always about numbers, but also optimization!

3. AngelicusMaximus

Posts: 702; Member since: Dec 20, 2017

I'd put some faith in what you're saying, but it's Samsung's manufacturing process that also made the Snapdragon 835 & 845. Those chips don't have any issues, so I can't necessarily agree with what you're saying. https://www.phonearena.com/news/Qualcomms-powerful-Snapdragon-845-chipset-goes-official_id100446

15. Ellio74

Posts: 74; Member since: Mar 22, 2018

If you prefer, it's the Samsung R&D that is the problem. The custom cores made (manufactured) by Samsung on the Exynos are the problem. But for the S845, Samsung is just putting things together from Qualcomm instructions.

18. AngelicusMaximus

Posts: 702; Member since: Dec 20, 2017

Perhaps you should say what you mean then. I just think it's funny that a company can make literally thousands of products with thousands of processes just fine, but the moment 1 or 2 things go wrong, people think it's a systemic problem. You made a mistake in your first comment & then corrected it in the next which makes you 1 for 2. Maybe you need to work on your optimization as well?

20. Ellio74

Posts: 74; Member since: Mar 22, 2018

Or you could think a bit more! ;) The fact is that it's not better than the previous generation, it's like with the S810 but for a different aspect (battery life here). I've never made any mistake in my first comment. You understood what you wanted to. So in the second comment I had to explain what I meant to correct your misunderstanding...

22. AngelicusMaximus

Posts: 702; Member since: Dec 20, 2017

If that makes you feel better, then keep on believing it.

24. Ellio74

Posts: 74; Member since: Mar 22, 2018

That's not about feelings, just about reading! ;)

56. Stappy3

Posts: 108; Member since: Dec 09, 2015

This is the type of discussion PA needs in the comments. Winky faces showing all is good ;)

59. M.O.A.B

Posts: 319; Member since: Feb 13, 2015

the SD 810 was a complete failure and disastrous, it kept overheating because of the poor semiconductor design (by qualcomm of course) and resulted in a poor battery life for all of the smartphones that was infected with the disastrous SD 810 while not providing any significant boost in performance compared to its predecessor , However the Exynos 9810 is a completely different scenario, it provided a significant boost in performance but with a small penalty to the battery life, which is to be expected when you put a much powerful SoC with the same battery capacity in its predecessor.

63. vincelongman

Posts: 5695; Member since: Feb 10, 2013

Don't take Geekbench for granted Its a poor benchmark for evaluating real world performance Read AnandTech's full reviewhttps://www.anandtech.com/show/12520/the-galaxy-s9-review/ tldr: In SPEC the Exynos has a 17-22% performance lead but a 35-58% efficiency disadvantage along with the 2x higher silicon area In PCMark, the new Exynos barely beats last year's Exynos and is way behind the 845 Its real world performance issues are due to poor schedular and DVFS (the Exynos 9810 takes over 5x longer to reach the maximum performance state of the Snapdragon 845) Good news is their GPU team has surprisingly managed to close the efficiency gap with Qualcomm (still a big performance gap and 2.5x higher silicon area) BOTH designing SoCs and manufacturing SoCs are insanely difficult tasks Hence why there's barely a hand full of companies in each sector That being said, this is the third year in a row the Exynos CPU team have lost to ARM's CPU team Whoever's in charge should be worried for their job

67. Ellio74

Posts: 74; Member since: Mar 22, 2018

Yes, Qualcomm is better with its own design. The first series of A57-A53 was disappointing. As I said earlier, that's a totally different issue, but the thing is, the 9810 didn't improve on its predecessor on this (key) aspect.

58. M.O.A.B

Posts: 319; Member since: Feb 13, 2015

samsung's custom cores eats what it's putting together from qualcomm for breakfast, what are even talking about? the M3 cores are scoring almost the double that is being scored by the SD 845 in the single core bench ! and in case you didn't know, the R&D that "put together what is qualcomm instructing" is the same R&D that engineered the M3 custom cores, do you think that fabricating someone else's semiconductor design is a simple thing to do? let alone fabricating it according to Samsung's latest 10nm LPP process? Please stop snorting cocaine before commenting again here for the gods sake

69. Ellio74

Posts: 74; Member since: Mar 22, 2018

You're talking about single core performance, so Geekbench I guess, am I right? You should take a look at other benchmark so (though we all know benchmark don't tell the whole story), and think again... That may be the case (but I don't really care) and if it is, I don't know how they have been able to success in one area (10 nm LPP) and not the other (M3 custom cores) Samsung is just bringing its 10 nm LPP capabilities and is "putting the SOC together". If TSMC or any other manufacturer could have done better, Qualcomm would have go with it. That's after reading some comments like this that I consider snorting cocaine...

70. Ellio74

Posts: 74; Member since: Mar 22, 2018

You're talking about single core performance, so Geekbench I guess, am I right? You should take a look at other benchmark so (though we all know benchmark don't tell the whole story), and think again... That may be the case (but I don't really care) and if it is, I don't know how they have been able to success in one area (10 nm LPP) and not the other (M3 custom cores) Samsung is just bringing its 10 nm LPP capabilities and is "putting the SOC together". If TSMC or any other manufacturer could have done better, Qualcomm would have go with it. That's after reading some comments like this that I consider snorting cocaine...

34. Xperia14

Posts: 1208; Member since: Sep 01, 2015

Designed by Qualcomm though.

6. TechSceptic

Posts: 1156; Member since: Feb 05, 2018

Samsung is manufacturing, has manufactured and still manufactures hardware for both Apple, Qualcomm and essentially everyone else. The reason they are frequently picked is because of their abilities within manufacturing. Samsung is one of the best manufacturers in the world. If that wasn't the case, Apple wouldn't use them for both displays, chips and so on. The issue, however, seems to be with the design of the Exynos chip, not the manufacturing. The Exynos chips are really powerful, but they aren't as efficient as you would like them to be.

8. Humanoid

Posts: 1226; Member since: Dec 11, 2017

A11 is made by TSMC, not Samsung

14. AngelicusMaximus

Posts: 702; Member since: Dec 20, 2017

What's your point? Where did he say Samsung made the A11? Apple still uses Samsung for many hardware components which means they trust their manufacturing process for many things. The fact that Samsung didn't make the A11 is a moot point.

64. Trex95

Posts: 2381; Member since: Mar 03, 2013

iPhone X OLED, nandflash manufacturing by Samsung, Apple Watch screen manufacturing by Samsung including Apple watch Soc other than that TSMC and LG for IPS screen for iPhone 8/ 8 Plus and latest iPad Pro.

12. BuffaloSouce unregistered

Samsung hasn’t manufactured a chip for Apple since the A7....TSMC has been manufacturing their processors every since...

16. AngelicusMaximus

Posts: 702; Member since: Dec 20, 2017

23. Ellio74

Posts: 74; Member since: Mar 22, 2018

That's what I meant but by manufacturing I include the design etc. Because Samsung manufactures Qualcomm SOC according to Qualcomm "wishes". The Exynos however is manufactured by Samsung from scratch.

31. yalokiy

Posts: 1008; Member since: Aug 01, 2016

You keep on confusing chip design with the actual manufacturing.

37. Ellio74

Posts: 74; Member since: Mar 22, 2018

I'm not confusing anything. Taking care about the chip design is part of the manufacturing process if you want it to work properly. Otherwise, Qualcomm would also have issues with its SOCs,as Samsung is also manufacturing these ones.

41. AngelicusMaximus

Posts: 702; Member since: Dec 20, 2017

I guess you just forgot that the 808 & 810 which had massive issues. I guess you also forgot that the Exynos chip has been more efficient for at least 3 generations prior to this year.

42. Ellio74

Posts: 74; Member since: Mar 22, 2018

No, just look at an answer I wrote ealier that talked about the S810 because of its (heat) issues (and I certainly know what it is about because I owned a phone with this S810). And here comes the debate about Exynos and Snapdragon efficiency, power, etc...

44. yalokiy

Posts: 1008; Member since: Aug 01, 2016

The fact that samsung is doing both design and manufacturing for exynos chips, doesn't mean the second includes the first.

47. Ellio74

Posts: 74; Member since: Mar 22, 2018

I perfectly know that, but in the end you can't do one (the SOC) without the other (the chip design). But both can be made separately, by different companies. That's why when Samsung isn't in charge of the chip design but only in charge of "putting thins together" it works as intented.

43. yalokiy

Posts: 1008; Member since: Aug 01, 2016

No, it's not. Apple does chip-design, TSMC or Samsung do the manufacturing. One provides instructions how things have to be build, the other just does the building.

45. Ellio74

Posts: 74; Member since: Mar 22, 2018

The chip design is part of the manufacturing process. You can't manufacture a chip without the chip design but you can design a chip without manufacturing it. That's exactly what Apple, Qualcomm, and others do. To manufacture a chip, the chip design is needed, so it is part of the manufacturing process. But things can be understood differently I guess.

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