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T-Mobile MDA Review

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The design of the MDA is an evolution of the I-Mate Jam, which was the smallest Pocket PC for its time. Although the footprint remained essentially the same, the MDA is actually a little thicker, which is due mostly to the added slide-out keyboard.

T-Mobile MDA Review
T-Mobile MDA Review
T-Mobile MDA Review

The screen is a nice and bright QVGA (240X320), touch sensitive TFT display, that's worthy of your photos and videos. It is surrounded by some of the shortcut and soft keys and fits in very well with the overall design of the device. In bright sunlight the screen gets washed out easily even at it's brightest level. If you happen to put a screen protector on there things get even worse. However the sheer size of it is great for videos and pictures.

T-Mobile MDA Review


As far as the size of the MDA is concerned you'll find it bulkier than most phones but right down small compared to other devices of this niche. It fits very well in the palm of even smaller hands, and although thick it's quite bearable in a pocket. The material that the phone is made out of is plastic, but it doesn't feel cheap, and that's good. Actually overall it feels quite solid. Even the sliding keyboard clicks nicely into place when it's slid open or closed. 

T-Mobile MDA Review
MDA and a credit card
T-Mobile MDA Review
6030;MDA;N90(left-to-right)
T-Mobile MDA Review
V360;N90;MDA(top-to-bottom)
T-Mobile MDA Review
T-Mobile MDA Review
T-Mobile MDA Review
T-Mobile MDA Review
T-Mobile MDA Review
T-Mobile MDA Review


The QWERTY keyboard itself although a nice addition especially to a phone like this leaves some things to be desired. Many people try to compare it with the similar keyboards of other devices – e.g. Treo 600, Sidekick II, various Blackberries. Well, it could be both considered better and worse than some of these. The area over which the keyboard is situated is pretty large and is comparable to the Sidekick II. The keys however are larger and thus feel a bit cramped. All letters of the Latin alphabet are fit on there; however the numbers don't have dedicated keys, but are sharing keys with the letters, and some commonly used symbols are on there as well. You have a little function key on the bottom left corner that lets you select between the numbers and symbols, and the letters with the one or two strokes depending on whether you need the selected function once or more. One more complaint about the keyboard that we have is that the keys are almost flush with the plastic surrounding them, so although they feel very nicely to the touch, it's just a little uncomfortable to use and you'll find yourself looking at the keyboard maybe more than you wished. I guess with a sliding design like this some compromises had to be made.

T-Mobile MDA Review
T-Mobile MDA Review
T-Mobile MDA Review


If you happen to find yourself using the keypad in the dark, you'll see that it is supported by an uneven and dim backlight, which goes out after a couple of seconds of down time. Unfortunately it is not adjustable, so you'll have to deal with it.

T-Mobile MDA Review


The sliding action of the keyboard feels nice, although it's not spring assisted, it's not hard. And with it clicking into place when you slide it open or closed it is really giving a lot better feel to the overall design

Another way to input information with devices like that is with a stylus. The MDA has one built in. Its silo is located on the bottom of the device, and most people look for it for a while until they find it. The stylus itself is extendable from just over 2 inches to just over 3 inches, so even at that extended length is a little uncomfortable to use, and you might wish it was a bit longer. It does not fit in the silo very tight, so there's always a chance that you might lose it. But T-Mobile have thought of that, and have included an extra stylus in the kit. Now you just have to remember to take it with you everywhere you go.

Like all Windows Mobile devices the MDA features a 5-way scroll key, as well as 2 soft keys and 5 programmable shortcut keys, which can be really helpful through the menus, and can immensely aid one handed use. The Send and End keys under the screen are standard for all phones and are not programmable. All buttons have a nice and soft responsive feel to them, no hard clicks and cheap plastic here. 3 of the programmable shortcut keys are located on the sides of the device. Out of the box they're assigned to Voice Dial and Camera on the right side and Communications Manager on the left side. On the face of the device above the screen you'll find the Browser and Messaging keys. Now all of these are programmable, so you can set them up to your taste with your choice of programs. Below the screen are the two softkeys, the navigational pad, and the phone keys. Those are not programmable.

T-Mobile MDA Review
T-Mobile MDA Review


Also on the side you'll see a volume slider key, an infrared port, and on the top are the Mini SD card slot and the power button. The charging port and the headset jack are on the bottom of the device. That's where you'll find the stylus, as well as the battery door release.
 On the back of the device is the 1.3 Megapixel camera joined by a little self portrait mirror, as well as a photolight, which I would not dare call a flash.

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HTC Wizard

HTC Wizard

OS: Windows Mobile Professional 5.0
view full specs
Display240 x 320 pixels TFT
Camera1.3 megapixels
Hardware
TI OMAP850, Single core, 195 MHz
64 MB RAM
Size4.25 x 2.28 x 0.93 inches
(108 x 58 x 24 mm)
5.64 oz  (160 g)
Battery1250 mAh, 5 hours talk time

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