x PhoneArena is looking for new authors! To view all available positions, click here.

T-Mobile G-Slate Review

Posted: , by John V.

Tags:

Go to page
Messaging:

For a tablet that employs an 8.9” display, we actually find it slightly easier to use over larger sized models out there. Strangely enough though, we actually find the G-Slate’s portrait style keyboard a bit more usable than its landscape one since it’s narrow enough for our thumbs to completely encompass its layout. In fact, the experience is similar to any smartphone out there as we’re able to comfortably type at a peppy rate without much falter. Moreover, you get a sense of responsiveness seeing that it’s able to keep up with our speedy typing – while still highlighting every button that’s pressed along the way. Aside from our desire to see some numbers implemented into the first row of buttons, which would increase the typing rate, we’re satisfied by the G-Slate’s overall peppy performance.

Just when the Gmail experience on an Android smartphone was good enough, the T-Mobile G-Slate takes it to a whole new level and seemingly brings forth a near perfect desktop-like experience. Three panes grace the experience as the left most one displays all the folders in the account, the middle allows you to scroll through all your emails, while the third one shifts over once a message is selected in the middle pane. Naturally, we’re greeted with all the rich features we’d come to expect out of the desktop experience – like threaded conversations, archiving, starring, and labeling. Indubitably, we’re glad to see that the transition to the tablet space is well thought out; thus making for one well rounded experience.

Aside from Gmail, the Email app will aggregate all your emails from various accounts. Setup is blatantly a simple process for generic clients, such as Yahoo or Hotmail, but in those instances when you’re trying to set something not as popular, it’ll require additional items like server addresses and ports to properly complete. Just like the Gmail app, the three identical paned layout is present once again, but you can quickly switch between accounts by pressing down on the area in the Action Bar.


Internet and Connectivity:

Certainly, you’ll be able to take the T-Mobile G-Slate abroad and still expect to get some sort of data connectivity, due to its HSPA connection. However, you can always switch to using its 802.11 b/g/n Wi-Fi in the extreme circumstance you find yourself outside of any cellular connection. In addition, the T-Mobile G-Slate packs aGPS for your location based services and Bluetooth 2.1 to get other wireless peripherals to connect with it.

Out of the box, the T-Mobile G-Slate actually lacks support for Flash Player 10.2, but it has a “Get Flash” icon amongst the app panel that basically diverts you to the download page in the Android Market. Once installed, you’re going to be presented with an amazing desktop like experience.

Surfing the web with the T-Mobile G-Slate - T-Mobile G-Slate Review
Surfing the web with the T-Mobile G-Slate - T-Mobile G-Slate Review
Surfing the web with the T-Mobile G-Slate - T-Mobile G-Slate Review
Surfing the web with the T-Mobile G-Slate - T-Mobile G-Slate Review
Surfing the web with the T-Mobile G-Slate - T-Mobile G-Slate Review
Surfing the web with the T-Mobile G-Slate - T-Mobile G-Slate Review
Surfing the web with the T-Mobile G-Slate - T-Mobile G-Slate Review
Surfing the web with the T-Mobile G-Slate - T-Mobile G-Slate Review

Surfing the web with the T-Mobile G-Slate



Thanks to its HSPA connection, complex pages load very quickly – leaving you plenty of time to start navigating around a page. Complementing its capacity, we experience stellar navigational qualities like responsive kinetic zooming, receptive pinch zooming, and double tapping that automatically reflows text to fit the length of the display. And in the wake of heavy Flash content, the G-Slate doesn’t stutter much with its operation – thus leaving us with a grateful and exhilarating web browsing experience that’s up there in terms of usability.

5 Comments
  • Options
    Close




posted on 23 Apr 2011, 09:11

1. AppleFUD (unregistered)


Requiring glasses for 3D on a tablet = FAIL!

Google still needs to step it up on Honeycomb. I'm surprised that they haven't had a major update yet. . . only one minor one. The browser is a ways off from the desktop version of Chrome and that's what they "advertised" when Honeycomb first hit the market--just check the desktop version of Google docs on it. . . not good.

posted on 23 Apr 2011, 09:37 1

2. remixfa (Posts: 13909; Member since: 19 Dec 2008)


I dont mind that it requires glasses. I just think its odd that they went with the red/blue style instead of the newer style found in theaters. I guess it was a development cost thing, but for that price i would have expected better.

Other than that, the tablet is fantastic. Ive been messing with it for over a week now. :)

posted on 23 Apr 2011, 17:37

3. cheetah2k (Posts: 817; Member since: 16 Jan 2011)


I love Android, but the one thing I can see from all of these Android tablets is that Google and the manufacturers have yet to produce a "smooth as silk" UI like the ipad and ipad 2.

This is another reason why I just bought the Playbook. I played around with the UI and tried my hardest to get some lag, but it never happened. Sure it might not have native email or calender (yet) but constant UI lag frustration is where the Android Tabs (and phones) are let down.. I mean, FFS, dual core should be making a massive difference for Android, but in the real world, its not..

This review is just another disappointment, but reminds me that I made the right decision ordering the Playbook.

posted on 23 Apr 2011, 21:00

4. Eingild (Posts: 203; Member since: 19 Apr 2011)


The reason why iPad produces "smooth as silk" UI is that it stops processing when you touch the screen. Having said that, I have to agree with you because to a normal consumer useability beats functionality. Android devices are used to telling people "We have dual core, 3D camera, this and that.." while in fact all the consumers care about is what can their device do rather than what it has. Maybe the secret to this is on the advertising of Android products in which Apple has done an incredible Jobs. I mean job.

posted on 26 Apr 2011, 18:21

5. jendral (unregistered)


wo this good enough.
by phone gallery

Want to comment? Please login or register.

Display8.9 inches, 1280 x 768 pixels (168 ppi)
Camera5 megapixels
Hardware
NVIDIA Tegra 2, Dual core, 1000 MHz
Size9.56 x 5.88 x 0.49 inches
(243 x 149 x 12 mm)
21.87 oz  (620 g)

Latest stories