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T-Mobile G-Slate Review

Posted: , by John V.

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Relying on the same exact blistering 1GHz dual-core NVIDIA Tegra 2 processor found in use with the Motorola XOOM, the T-Mobile G-Slate operates at a high level to offer an engaging platform experience. Although we’re able to smoothly navigate between its homescreen in landscape with a live wallpaper activated, you get a sense that the platform isn’t quite adept in portrait due to the noticeable amount of choppy movements evident while navigating in this orientation. Nonetheless, it doesn’t particularly detract from its overall speedy nature – which is translated well into almost every aspect of the platform. All in all, the performance is similar to the XOOM, which should be decent enough for anyone, but it still falls behind the wicked responsiveness of the iPad 2.

The T-Mobile G-Slate is powered by Android 3.0 Honeycomb - T-Mobile G-Slate Review
The T-Mobile G-Slate is powered by Android 3.0 Honeycomb - T-Mobile G-Slate Review
The T-Mobile G-Slate is powered by Android 3.0 Honeycomb - T-Mobile G-Slate Review
The T-Mobile G-Slate is powered by Android 3.0 Honeycomb - T-Mobile G-Slate Review
The T-Mobile G-Slate is powered by Android 3.0 Honeycomb - T-Mobile G-Slate Review
The T-Mobile G-Slate is powered by Android 3.0 Honeycomb - T-Mobile G-Slate Review
The T-Mobile G-Slate is powered by Android 3.0 Honeycomb - T-Mobile G-Slate Review
The T-Mobile G-Slate is powered by Android 3.0 Honeycomb - T-Mobile G-Slate Review
The T-Mobile G-Slate is powered by Android 3.0 Honeycomb - T-Mobile G-Slate Review
The T-Mobile G-Slate is powered by Android 3.0 Honeycomb - T-Mobile G-Slate Review
The T-Mobile G-Slate is powered by Android 3.0 Honeycomb - T-Mobile G-Slate Review
The T-Mobile G-Slate is powered by Android 3.0 Honeycomb - T-Mobile G-Slate Review

The T-Mobile G-Slate is powered by Android 3.0 Honeycomb



Hooray for T-Mobile customers! They’re able to finally experience Android 3.0 Honeycomb in its full glory with the G-Slate. Naturally, newcomers will undoubtedly be mesmerized with the futuristic look of Honeycomb, but there really isn’t anything superiorly different that we haven’t seen with the XOOM. Aside from a few tablet specific apps and widgets, the stock Android 3.0 Honeycomb experience is intact with the G-Slate. Specifically, some of the new apps bundled for the ride are AccuWeather, Data Viz’s Documents to Go, Need for Speed Shift, Quickoffice, T-Mobile TV, and Zinio Reader. Of course, there’s plenty of eye candy littered all around for your eyes to feast on, but you’re still presented with the superb personalization aspects with the tablet platform. If you want a more detailed and comprehensive look at all the minute aspects of Android 3.0 Honeycomb, like the functions of the Action and System bars, you can read more about it here.

T-Mobile TV - T-Mobile G-Slate Review
T-Mobile TV - T-Mobile G-Slate Review
T-Mobile TV - T-Mobile G-Slate Review

T-Mobile TV


Need for Speed Shift - T-Mobile G-Slate Review
Need for Speed Shift - T-Mobile G-Slate Review
Need for Speed Shift - T-Mobile G-Slate Review
Need for Speed Shift - T-Mobile G-Slate Review

Need for Speed Shift


AccuWeather - T-Mobile G-Slate Review
T-Mobile G-Slate Review
T-Mobile G-Slate Review
T-Mobile G-Slate Review

AccuWeather

   

Zinio Reader - T-Mobile G-Slate Review
Zinio Reader - T-Mobile G-Slate Review
Zinio Reader - T-Mobile G-Slate Review
Zinio Reader - T-Mobile G-Slate Review

Zinio Reader



Contacts:

Realizing the common theme of making use of the expanded space available, most of the core Android apps takes advantage of the spacious confines of the display – which is evident with the Contacts app. Two panes basically take up the entire layout, one being the left area where you can scroll through your listing, while the other displays pertinent details with each contact. Naturally, you can sync Facebook and Twitter contacts, which seems to favor the latter since it will show their most recent Tweets. Nevertheless, adding new contacts is a straightforward process as you’ll have plenty of information to associate with each person. And finally, contacts will be synced to your Google account to keep your mind at ease in the event of a catastrophic event plaguing the G-Slate.

Contacts app - T-Mobile G-Slate Review
Contacts app - T-Mobile G-Slate Review

Contacts app



Organizer:

There isn’t much drastically different found with the Calendar app, aside from the expanded view we’re presented with. In any event, you can position it to display in either month, week, or day views – with the latter two being split up by two panes. Of course, you can also add a new event, with relevant information, to the calendar as it syncs with the appropriate calendar account.

Calendar app - T-Mobile G-Slate Review
Calendar app - T-Mobile G-Slate Review
Calendar app - T-Mobile G-Slate Review
Calendar app - T-Mobile G-Slate Review

Calendar app



If there is one thing missing with Android 3.0 Honeycomb that’s found on previous versions, it has to be the wide array of functions found with the Clock app. Instead, the one present on the G-Slate will only display the digital clock – where you can set up an alarm as well. Strangely, it’s missing some other key components such as a world clock, stopwatch, and timer.

Unfortunately, there is no love for the Calculator app since it’s an exact facsimile to what’s found previously. Both in portrait and landscape views, we’re presented with the basic and advanced functions of the calculator – but that’s all! Somewhat funny, the size of the buttons are extraordinary larger than most things found with the platform.

Lastly, Voice Search is brought along for the ride, rightfully so, but like what we’ve seen already with a couple of other things, it doesn’t get any new functionality. Still, it pretty much accomplishes the same tasks as before, such as being able to launch Google Maps Navigation, by simply speaking “Navigate to.”

Clock app - T-Mobile G-Slate Review
Calculator app - T-Mobile G-Slate Review
Voice Search - T-Mobile G-Slate Review

Clock app

Calculator app

Voice Search



5 Comments
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posted on 23 Apr 2011, 09:11

1. AppleFUD (unregistered)


Requiring glasses for 3D on a tablet = FAIL!

Google still needs to step it up on Honeycomb. I'm surprised that they haven't had a major update yet. . . only one minor one. The browser is a ways off from the desktop version of Chrome and that's what they "advertised" when Honeycomb first hit the market--just check the desktop version of Google docs on it. . . not good.

posted on 23 Apr 2011, 09:37 1

2. remixfa (Posts: 13902; Member since: 19 Dec 2008)


I dont mind that it requires glasses. I just think its odd that they went with the red/blue style instead of the newer style found in theaters. I guess it was a development cost thing, but for that price i would have expected better.

Other than that, the tablet is fantastic. Ive been messing with it for over a week now. :)

posted on 23 Apr 2011, 17:37

3. cheetah2k (Posts: 737; Member since: 16 Jan 2011)


I love Android, but the one thing I can see from all of these Android tablets is that Google and the manufacturers have yet to produce a "smooth as silk" UI like the ipad and ipad 2.

This is another reason why I just bought the Playbook. I played around with the UI and tried my hardest to get some lag, but it never happened. Sure it might not have native email or calender (yet) but constant UI lag frustration is where the Android Tabs (and phones) are let down.. I mean, FFS, dual core should be making a massive difference for Android, but in the real world, its not..

This review is just another disappointment, but reminds me that I made the right decision ordering the Playbook.

posted on 23 Apr 2011, 21:00

4. Eingild (Posts: 203; Member since: 19 Apr 2011)


The reason why iPad produces "smooth as silk" UI is that it stops processing when you touch the screen. Having said that, I have to agree with you because to a normal consumer useability beats functionality. Android devices are used to telling people "We have dual core, 3D camera, this and that.." while in fact all the consumers care about is what can their device do rather than what it has. Maybe the secret to this is on the advertising of Android products in which Apple has done an incredible Jobs. I mean job.

posted on 26 Apr 2011, 18:21

5. jendral (unregistered)


wo this good enough.
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Display8.9 inches, 1280 x 768 pixels (168 ppi)
Camera5 megapixels
Hardware
NVIDIA Tegra 2, Dual core, 1000 MHz
Size9.56 x 5.88 x 0.49 inches
(243 x 149 x 12 mm)
21.87 oz  (620 g)

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