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Motorola i1 Review

Posted: , by John V.

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Multimedia:

In portrait view, the Media Gallery app will display all your photos and videos in grid like view, however, there is a dramatic change in landscape where it switches to a 3D view, which enables you to scroll through your media. Nonetheless, you can edit some items through the phone, but it lacks multi-touch gestures like pinching to zoom in.

The Media Gallery app - Motorola i1 Review
The Media Gallery app - Motorola i1 Review
The Media Gallery app - Motorola i1 Review

The Media Gallery app



Pressing down the shutter button will load up the photo taking app, which offers a decent mix of options to fine tune your images. Slightly pressing down the shutter key will toggle it to focus, then pressing it all the way will capture the shot. To our amusement, we were more than satisfied with the images captured with the 5-megapixel shooter on the Motorola i1. There is a fair amount of detail in the photos with them looking a tad a little over-exposed in conditions where lighting is abundant. The same cannot be said about images taken indoors in poor lighting as they were hazy looking with washed out colors. Despite packing an LED flash, it did very little to improve the condition.

The camera interface - Motorola i1 Review
The camera interface - Motorola i1 Review

The camera interface


Camera samples taken with Motorola i1 - Motorola i1 Review
Camera samples taken with Motorola i1 - Motorola i1 Review
Camera samples taken with Motorola i1 - Motorola i1 Review
Camera samples taken with Motorola i1 - Motorola i1 Review
Camera samples taken with Motorola i1 - Motorola i1 Review
Camera samples taken with Motorola i1 - Motorola i1 Review
Camera samples taken with Motorola i1 - Motorola i1 Review
Camera samples taken with Motorola i1 - Motorola i1 Review
Camera samples taken with Motorola i1 - Motorola i1 Review
Camera samples taken with Motorola i1 - Motorola i1 Review
Camera samples taken with Motorola i1 - Motorola i1 Review
Camera samples taken with Motorola i1 - Motorola i1 Review
Camera samples taken with Motorola i1 - Motorola i1 Review
Camera samples taken with Motorola i1 - Motorola i1 Review
Camera samples taken with Motorola i1 - Motorola i1 Review
Camera samples taken with Motorola i1 - Motorola i1 Review
Camera samples taken with Motorola i1 - Motorola i1 Review

Camera samples taken with Motorola i1


Strong - Motorola i1 Review
Medium - Motorola i1 Review
Low light - Motorola i1 Review
Darkness with flash - Motorola i1 Review

Strong

Medium

Low light

Darkness with flash



Not known for being a media centric device, the i1 features CIF video recording which will present you with a maximum shooting resolution of 352x288 at 15fps. Pixelated beyond belief, there is still a lot of prominent choppiness throughout playback which easily downgrades the experience – plus it lacks any audio recording; so you'd probably want to move on if video recording is a must-have on your list.

Motorola i1 sample video at 352x288 pixels resolution.

The stock Android music player is in play on the Motorola i1 which functions properly like any other out there, but pales in comparison and presentation over newer offerings. Still, it does the job and the sound emitted by the speaker is more than audible to the ear as its power is substantially strong. When placed at the maximum setting, it manages to still be pleasant to the ear with its sharp tunes.

The music player of Motorola i1 - Motorola i1 Review
The music player of Motorola i1 - Motorola i1 Review
The music player of Motorola i1 - Motorola i1 Review

The music player of Motorola i1



Watching videos didn't pose too much of an issue as we were able to load a video coded in MPEG-4 at 320x240 resolution. Additionally we were able to load another in 800x480 resolution, however, it easily began to come to a crawl as it was noticeably more choppy.

Motorola i1 Review
Motorola i1 Review


The unit is packaged with a 2GB microSD card which should be more than satisfactory for those who plan on utilizing its outdoor photo taking prowess to the max. To top things off too, there is also a microSD card adapter which will allow you to easily copy data back and forth between a computer.


Data/Connectivity:

You'd better check out coverage maps before simply going through with an impulse purchase with the Motorola i1 seeing that it's a dual-band iDEN (800/900 MHz) handset – which is limited in it's ability to penetrate the tough confines of most buildings. Sadly, this isn't a hybrid device that would rely on Sprint's EVDO data network, instead it routes data through the sole iDEN network.

Unless you're connected to Wi-Fi, you'd better stick to using the Opera Mini browser that's pre-installed as opposed to the stock one. Since the iDEN network isn't adept in dealing with data intensive devices, relying on the stock browser can be frustrating with sluggish load times – which took over 5 minutes for our web site to load. It doesn't end there as the stock web browsing experience lacks multi-touch gestures to zoom, which is instead done via using the on-screen zoom icons. Thankfully, Opera Mini manages to salvage what's left as it's able to load pages slightly faster thanks to Opera's compressing service on its end – thus enabling a slightly more tolerable experience.

Opera Mini - Motorola i1 Review
Opera Mini - Motorola i1 Review
Opera Mini - Motorola i1 Review
Opera Mini - Motorola i1 Review

Opera Mini


8 Comments
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posted on 20 Oct 2010, 01:55

1. ace1122 (Posts: 237; Member since: 23 Mar 2009)


I like the idea of a rugged smart phone except this phone seems so outdated. I want a rugged DROID. That'd be awesome. But this phone would still be cool but not with the pricey smartphone plan.

posted on 28 Jul 2010, 16:46

2. cartman (Posts: 45; Member since: 11 Dec 2008)


They still should have put a CDMA radio to use EVDO data. Or they could have done with WiMax. Does anyone know the data speeds on iden? I'm guessing its like couple of hundred kbs

posted on 02 Aug 2010, 10:23

3. stuntz (Posts: 178; Member since: 19 Dec 2008)


iden data speeds are like 56K

posted on 30 Oct 2010, 19:14

4. Chris (unregistered)


I am a dispatcher for a busy taxi service. I use the Motorola i1, and our drivers use a "standard" Nextel PTT. The i1 is packed with features that make my job easier. With traditional iDEN phones, you can't use PTT and data service at the same time. The i1 is wifi enabled. While connected to wifi, the all the PTT features are available. This allows me to use Google maps, and other internet utilities, without missing PTT call. Running on the Android platform there are tons of cool apps., but use caution. Some apps. make a constant internet connection through the "data" (not wifi) connection on the i1. This WILL block incoming/outgoing PTT calls. There is also some modulation issues. On older Nextell equipment, the i1 sounds over modulated. PTT calls that are i1 to i1, are great. But if you PTT a buddy with an old phone, you will blow his ear drums out. The only problem that I have with the phone is the charger. This platform is picky, I have used an aftermarket charger with poor results. The phone hangs and freezes.

posted on 25 Dec 2010, 11:13

5. Eddie Z (unregistered)


I've had this phone a couple of months and it's not that bad. Sure, if you want a full PC in the palm of your hand then there are better to chose from. I wanted a rugged phone and this is the only one that fits the bill. I've dropped it from 4 feet with no damage whatsoever. The screen is responsive and since I don't rely on data the speed isn't a real concern. I have access to enough wi-fi points so that's not a real concern. Opera is the choice to use however. I've loaded this up with a number of apps with good results. Be ready to trim some apps or change some settings to bet good battery results. I think Motorola should offer a major rebate or deal once the get another rugged droid out there that would use a more up to date version of Android. One major flaw is the on screen keyboard. It is way too small to easily use. I've installed Big Buttons and that makes texting a whole lot easier. Screen picture quality is more than acceptable. I wouldn't even think of video on a screen this small so I'm not going to comment on it. Overall it's a good phone, certainly not Motorolas best effort but you have to remember they wanted a stable OS platform for the IDEN network. Rugged, nice size, good sound quality and a good selection of apps makes this a safe choice for the outdoor folks. If you need it to be prettier and certainly faster with all of the best there is to offer then this phone is not for you.

posted on 07 Feb 2011, 08:56

6. Ms (unregistered)


Al fin motorola tiene un telefono a la altura de su servicio. Un cagada!

posted on 07 Oct 2011, 23:12

7. jcgg (unregistered)


mmmmh i cant agree with your comments by im really unhappy with this phone its slow dont have tha same capability of other androids and the sarvice with nextel is horrible!!! i have nextel becoause of the international services they got but other than that i wouldnt have this phone.

posted on 07 Oct 2011, 23:13

8. jcgg (unregistered)


ahuevo es malisimo!!!!!!!!!

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Motorola i1

Motorola i1

OS: Android 1.5
view full specs
Display3.1 inches, 320 x 480 pixels (186 ppi) TFT
Camera5 megapixels
Hardware
Single core, 500 MHz, Freescale Zeus 2.0 ARM1136 processor
256 MB RAM
Size4.65 x 2.28 x 0.50 inches
(118 x 58 x 12.8 mm)
4.62 oz  (131 g)
Battery1400 mAh, 3.5 hours talk time

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