x PhoneArena is looking for new authors! To view all available positions, click here.

Lenovo Yoga Tablet 10 Review

Posted: , by John V.

Tags:

Go to page

Interface and Functionality


We’ve never taken fancy over any of Lenovo’s customized Android experiences, but they’ve once again decided to take a new direction with this tablet. In general, all the core functions of Android are intact with its customized Android 4.2.2 Jelly Bean experience, however, they buck the trend by eliminating the apps panel altogether. You’d think this would simplify things, but it doesn’t. Rather, it becomes a test of futility trying to find particular app icons. Worst yet, there’s no option to arrange them alphabetically. In the end, this particular implementation just feels a tad bit disorganized.

Still, there are several enhancements made to the homescreen that shows off Lenovo’s new approach. For starters, there are cool animations available when scrolling through the homescreen and rearranging icons/widgets. On top of the notifications panel and multi-tasking menu that we’re familiar with, Lenovo adds in a smart side bar that’s accessed from the homescreen by swiping left from the right section of the display – presenting us quick access to certain apps and other options.

Quite honestly, we didn’t expect to find anything extravagant with the customized experience, even more when they decided to do away with the apps panel. It’s not the most intuitive or features rich experience, but everyone has to start somewhere.

Sporting the stock Android keyboard, it’s especially most useful with the landscape option – just because it works well when the tablet is in tilt mode. With its spacious layout, speedy response, and good auto-correct feature, there’s nothing we don’t like with this.

Processor and Memory


In order to meet its pricing criteria, Lenovo opted to outfit the Yoga Tablet 10 with an unfamiliar piece of silicon – a quad-core 1.2GHz MediaTek MT8125 processor coupled with 1GB of RAM. It’s not something we’d refer to as first-class hardware, but nonetheless, it’s effective enough to handle most basic tasks with ease. However, it strains and cracks under pressure with more processor intensive stuff.

For something priced so low, it’s awesome that it’s blessed with 16GB of internal storage, which can be further supplemented by its available microSD card slot.

Performance benchmarks

Quadrant
Higher is better
Samsung Galaxy Tab 3 10.1-inch 6047
Lenovo Yoga Tablet 10 4788
AnTuTu
Higher is better
Samsung Galaxy Tab 3 10.1-inch 19952
Lenovo Yoga Tablet 10 13269
GFXBench Egypt HD 2.5 onscreen (fps)
Higher is better
Samsung Galaxy Tab 3 10.1-inch 32
Lenovo Yoga Tablet 10 13
Vellamo Metal
Higher is better
Samsung Galaxy Tab 3 10.1-inch 623
Lenovo Yoga Tablet 10 465
Vellamo HTML 5
Higher is better
Samsung Galaxy Tab 3 10.1-inch 1731
Lenovo Yoga Tablet 10 1501
View all

Internet and Connectivity


Its screen isn’t the most detailed, nor does it have the fastest performance with its processor, but at least things are swell with the web browsing experience. Heck, at the very least, it has all the elements that make it fantastic – such as quick page loads, fast rendering, and smooth navigational controls.

Even though there’s a placeholder to what appears to be a SIM slot next to the microSD slot, there’s no mention if we’ll see this tablet become available with cellular connectivity in the future. Indeed, it’s stuck with 802.11 b/g/n Wi-Fi connectivity, as well as aGPS and Bluetooth 4.0, but it’s missing things like NFC and video-out functionality.

3 Comments
  • Options
    Close




posted on 15 Nov 2013, 04:44 1

1. emadshiny (Posts: 1127; Member since: 05 Dec 2012)


Hey PA team,
Do you have any plan to review Vaio Tap11 and Vaio Flip?
As far as im in a dilemma to buy a tablet or a transformer its so important for me to know it.

posted on 15 Nov 2013, 04:47 1

2. TylerGrunter (Posts: 857; Member since: 16 Feb 2012)


$299 for this tablet is now called Super inexpensive? I think there is some mistake here.
Either is Super expensive or the price is wrong.
I think the second as the price was suppossed to be $199, which is still 50 dollars more than the Asus memopad HD 7, which has similar HW but less battery and lower materials.

posted on 15 Nov 2013, 09:09

4. g2a5b0e (Posts: 2089; Member since: 08 Jun 2012)


You just compared a 10-inch tablet to a 7-inch. As far as 10-inch tablets go, $299 is fairly inexpensive.

Want to comment? Please login or register.

Display10.1 inches, 1280 x 800 pixels (149 ppi)
Camera5 megapixels
Hardware
MediaTek MT8125/8389, Quad core, 1200 MHz, ARM Cortex-A7 processor
1024 MB RAM
Size10.3 x 7.1 x 0.3 inches
(262 x 180 x 8 mm)
21.28 oz  (603 g)

Latest stories