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Google Nexus S vs Samsung Focus

Posted: , by John V.

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Interface & Functionality:

Even though these two top tiered smartphones feature processors operating at the speed of 1GHz, the Nexus S resorts to using Samsung's tried and true Hummingbird chipset, while the Focus packs a Snapdragon SoC in its belly. Regardless of the difference, they're still able to exhibit a sense of speed as everything you do resonates with responsive actions. From launching apps to scrolling long lists, we're rarely ever presented with a situation when either device ever slowed down to a crawl.

Largely being the most important item to consider before making a decision as to which device you'll want to choose, you'll have to meticulously break down whether or not you'll want to stick with Android or Windows Phone 7. Naturally, they both have their strengths to intrigue consumers, but it's fairly reasonable to say right now that Android 2.3 Gingerbread on the Nexus S is drastically more in-depth and mature in functionality. Additionally, there's a higher level of personalization thanks to the choice of widgets, shortcuts, folders, and live wallpapers available to the user. However, there are some people who will love the look and feel of the Metro UI on the Samsung Focus. Granted that it feels considerably polished for a newcomer, there is still some work required to get it to the same level on which we find Android right now.

You can 
personalize the homescreens of the Google Nexus S with various 
shortcuts, widgets, and folders - Google Nexus S vs Samsung Focus
You can 
personalize the homescreens of the Google Nexus S with various 
shortcuts, widgets, and folders - Google Nexus S vs Samsung Focus
You can 
personalize the homescreens of the Google Nexus S with various 
shortcuts, widgets, and folders - Google Nexus S vs Samsung Focus
3D cube Rolodex - You can 
personalize the homescreens of the Google Nexus S with various 
shortcuts, widgets, and folders - Google Nexus S vs Samsung Focus
   

3D cube Rolodex

You can personalize the homescreens of the Google Nexus S with various shortcuts, widgets, and folders


The Windows Phone 7 homescreen consists
of various square and rectangular tiles (Live
Tiles) - Google Nexus S vs Samsung Focus
The Windows Phone 7 homescreen consists
of various square and rectangular tiles (Live
Tiles) - Google Nexus S vs Samsung Focus
The Windows Phone 7 homescreen consists
of various square and rectangular tiles (Live
Tiles) - Google Nexus S vs Samsung Focus
The Windows Phone 7 homescreen consists
of various square and rectangular tiles (Live
Tiles) - Google Nexus S vs Samsung Focus

The Windows Phone 7 homescreen consists of various square and rectangular tiles (Live Tiles)



Without downloading dedicated apps, the Samsung Focus manages to tightly integrate some aspects of social networking with its platform better than the Nexus S. That's partly due to the “People” Hub which aggregates content accordingly and provides you the opportunity to even reply to comments. However, you can basically receive the same experience when you download the Facebook and Twitter apps for the Nexus S. In fact, you'll even have widgets available to you which will provide the same functionality we find with Windows Phone 7.

The “People” Hub on the Samsung Focus - Google Nexus S vs Samsung Focus
The “People” Hub on the Samsung Focus - Google Nexus S vs Samsung Focus
The “People” Hub on the Samsung Focus - Google Nexus S vs Samsung Focus
The “People” Hub on the Samsung Focus - Google Nexus S vs Samsung Focus

The “People” Hub on the Samsung Focus



Text messaging oriented individuals will be more than satisfied with the performance of both smartphones since the on-screen keyboards are super-conducive to speed typing. Thanks to things like predictive text, auto-correct, and their responsive tendencies, the overall experience is utterly stellar to make anyone quickly adapt and type with few mistakes. Now even though the portrait keyboard option of the Samsung Focus might look larger, their landscape keyboards are relatively similar in size – thus making it easy on your thumbs to type away.


We find a brand spanking new facelift to the stock Android keyboard on the Google Nexus S - Google Nexus S vs Samsung Focus
We find a brand spanking new facelift to the stock Android keyboard on the Google Nexus S - Google Nexus S vs Samsung Focus

We find a brand spanking new facelift to the stock Android keyboard on the Google Nexus S


The on-screen keyboard on the Samsung Focus is responsive and accurate and  auto-correct is on board - Google Nexus S vs Samsung Focus
The on-screen keyboard on the Samsung Focus is responsive and accurate and  auto-correct is on board - Google Nexus S vs Samsung Focus

The on-screen keyboard on the Samsung Focus is responsive and accurate and auto-correct is on board



Email setup is a hassle-free experience with both devices since accounts will automatically set up by only providing an email address and a password. However, there are some instances when other pieces of information are required to properly complete. But if you truly want to witness a productive Gmail experience, you'll more than likely find the Gmail app with the Nexus S to stand tall. That's because it tastefully brings along some useful features, like threaded view, that are commonly attuned to the desktop version.

Email on the Samsung Focus - Google Nexus S vs Samsung Focus
Email on the Samsung Focus - Google Nexus S vs Samsung Focus
Email on the Samsung Focus - Google Nexus S vs Samsung Focus
Email on the Samsung Focus - Google Nexus S vs Samsung Focus

Email on the Samsung Focus



As we mentioned already, the Google Nexus S sports a 0.3-megapixel camera front facing camera which allows for things like video chatting – which is something blatantly missing with the Samsung Focus.

Continuing to show off its depth of functionality, the Android 2.3 Gingerbread powered Nexus S offers features like tethering via USB or Wi-Fi, NFC support, native VoIP support, and a built-in gyroscope. Sadly, the Samsung Focus lacks any of those striking features which is a shame, but then again, you can hardly utilize the Nexus S's video chat camera, or its gyroscope, due to almost non-existent software for the purpose.


Internet and Connectivity:

For something new to the game, Internet Explorer with the Samsung Focus boastfully supplies an adept performance that rivals pretty much what the Android browser has to offer in its current and latest form. However, Flash support with the Nexus S is the only noticeable feature that separates the two – which some prefer since it provides that near desktop like feel. Nonetheless, they both perfectly offer rewarding things like multi-touch gesture support for zooming, smooth kinetic scrolling, and peppy load times. Still, the only small blemish found with the Nexus S is its jerky movements when navigating on pages with heavy Flash content.

Web browsing with the Google Nexus S - Google Nexus S vs Samsung Focus
Web browsing with the Google Nexus S - Google Nexus S vs Samsung Focus
Web browsing with the Google Nexus S - Google Nexus S vs Samsung Focus
Web browsing with the Google Nexus S - Google Nexus S vs Samsung Focus

Web browsing with the Google Nexus S


Internet
 Explorer on the Samsung Focus offers one of the most satisfying experiences to date - Google Nexus S vs Samsung Focus
Internet
 Explorer on the Samsung Focus offers one of the most satisfying experiences to date - Google Nexus S vs Samsung Focus
Internet
 Explorer on the Samsung Focus offers one of the most satisfying experiences to date - Google Nexus S vs Samsung Focus
Internet
 Explorer on the Samsung Focus offers one of the most satisfying experiences to date - Google Nexus S vs Samsung Focus

Internet Explorer on the Samsung Focus offers one of the most satisfying experiences to date



These GSM devices are the perfect traveling companion for trips abroad since they'll work in just about every corner of the globe. In the unfortunate event that you don't have any network connectivity, you can always rely on their good old 802.11 b/g/n Wi-Fi for an alternative connection. Moreover, we find Bluetooth 2.1 with EDR on board to allow a magnitude of other wireless devices to connect to them.

5 Comments
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posted on 27 Dec 2010, 09:46 2

1. Tre-Nitty (Posts: 460; Member since: 16 Nov 2010)


I'll stick with my focus but to each his own.

posted on 28 Dec 2010, 01:44

2. belovedson (Posts: 832; Member since: 30 Nov 2010)


an--droooiid

posted on 28 Dec 2010, 04:00 1

3. renegadEEE (Posts: 2; Member since: 11 Dec 2010)


I've switched my Nexus One for a LG Optimus 7 and I must say I'm very happy I did. I loved the Nexus One and I've used android from the very beginning (G1) bu to me its features cannot compete with the nice overall look and feel of Windows Phone 7. So I'd definitely choose the Focus.

posted on 05 Jan 2011, 01:42 1

4. Patchy Patch (unregistered)


Ive been an Android fan for a very long time....just recently did I decide to dish out $630 to Rogers to buy the Samsung Focus straight out. Best damn $630 I spent on a phone....sorry Android but WP7 is my OS of choice now and will be for a long time. So fast and fluid, the UI looks SO nice, 2 updates coming in 2011 for WP7 that will add a ton of flexibility and customization, and I have been saying this before and I will say it again, by the end of 2011 WP7 will be kickin ass and taking names!

posted on 26 Feb 2011, 00:35 1

5. ding ding ding (unregistered)


wp7 has i think the best user interface overall but once wp7 gets more developed i think it can become king i still prefer the focus though

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