x PhoneArena is looking for new authors! To view all available positions, click here.

Garmin-Asus Garminfone Review

Posted: , by John V.

Tags:

Go to page
Interface:

Now this is where the biggest disconnect can be found on the phone as it can be visibly seen that it was intended to be a GPS device first with some smartphone elements thrown into the mix – as opposed to the opposite way around. It's powered by a 600MHz Qualcomm 7227 ARM 11 processor with 256MB of both ROM and RAM, which does well in navigating about the platform as there are few moments when you begin to see the handset start to crawl. Although it's running Android 1.6, you don't necessarily see it as Garmin's proprietary user interface masks a good deal of things that most people traditionally find appealing about Android. Gone is the standard look of the platform as you're treated to Garmin's interface, however, there are still some elements that can be tied closely with the open platform.

This customized experience is by far the least eye-catching out there as you're initially presented to three rather large sized icons that are familiarly found on the Nuvifone G60 – these are the Call, Where To, and View Map buttons. While to the right of that, there is a scrollable panel that provides some quick access to some common functions without having to open the main app drawer. Of all the ones offered on there, launching widgets will get you into the familiar look of Android as you're able to move about 5 home screens, to which you can add different things – but unfortunately, it doesn't allow you to pick a specific wallpaper. Finally, you can get access and reveal all of the apps by sliding over the panel to the left most position. From there, you can essentially just scroll up and down to see the full listing of apps on the smartphone.

Garmin-Asus Garminfone is running Android 1.6 masked by proprietary user interface - Garmin-Asus Garminfone Review
Garmin-Asus Garminfone is running Android 1.6 masked by proprietary user interface - Garmin-Asus Garminfone Review
Garmin-Asus Garminfone is running Android 1.6 masked by proprietary user interface - Garmin-Asus Garminfone Review
Garmin-Asus Garminfone is running Android 1.6 masked by proprietary user interface - Garmin-Asus Garminfone Review

Garmin-Asus Garminfone is running Android 1.6 masked by proprietary user interface



Messaging:

By default, you're only presented to the stock Android keyboard for inputting text, but there's also a compact keypad for those who prefer to sticking to the usual layout of a regular phone. Although the 3.5” display might look roomy enough for the on-screen QWERTY, we found some evidence of lag when typing speedily. It's especially more prominent when predictive text is enabled as the phone is probably trying to keep up in what you're trying to type out. Thankfully though, we didn't find ourselves making too many mistakes when going at a normal pace – that's unless you're speed typing away. Switching over to landscape will present the most spacious offering, but there's still the dilemma of some slowdown plaguing the experience when typing fast.

Garmin-Asus Garminfone Review
Garmin-Asus Garminfone Review
Garmin-Asus Garminfone Review
Garmin-Asus Garminfone Review

Setting up email on the Garminfone is typical of other Android smartphones as you'll only need to provide relevant information like an email address and password to quickly set it up. However, it may require some additional pieces of information if it's not with one of the big name email providers out there. We managed to set our custom email without any hiccups though. Once you've got everything situated, you'll be able to look at each of your accounts separately as it lacks a combined inbox function. Still, the core elements are all there plus the Gmail experience is well integrated into the handset as it should.


Connectivity & Internet:

Fortunately the web browsing experience is drastically better than what was experienced on the Nuvifone G60 as it follows similarly to its Android brethren. At first glance, everything is pretty much what you expect in this category out of an Android powered smartphone as it has support for pinching gestures to zoom in and out, however, it irks us to find the lack of support for double pressing to accomplish the same task. Pages loaded fairly decently over T-Mobile's 3G network and it accurately rendered our site, but upon closer inspection, it blatantly doesn't re-size text to specific zoom levels – so that means there will be a lot of horizontal scrolling needed when reading long passages of text. When it came down to scrolling, there is a slight delay that can be seen sometimes, but at least it does feel rather responsive. Yeah it's nice to see the improved web browsing experience over the Nuvifone G60, but we find the overall experience to be lacking and not living up to the standards set by other Android smartphones.

Browsing the web on the Garmin-Asus Garminfone - Garmin-Asus Garminfone Review
Browsing the web on the Garmin-Asus Garminfone - Garmin-Asus Garminfone Review
Browsing the web on the Garmin-Asus Garminfone - Garmin-Asus Garminfone Review
Browsing the web on the Garmin-Asus Garminfone - Garmin-Asus Garminfone Review

Browsing the web on the Garmin-Asus Garminfone


International travelers won't have problems placing phone calls around the world as it's a quad-band (850/900/1800/1900 MHz) GSM device, but 3G speeds can be accomplished stateside through T-Mobile seeing that it has dual-band (1700/2100 MHz) UMTS connectivity. Additionally, there are other wireless connections on the handset such as 802.11 b/g Wi-Fi and Bluetooth 2.1.

0 Comments

Want to comment? Please login or register.

Display3.5 inches, 320 x 480 pixels (165 ppi) TFT
Camera3 megapixels
Hardware
Qualcomm Snapdragon S1 MSM7227, Single core, 600 MHz, ARM11 processor
256 MB RAM
Size4.57 x 2.46 x 0.49 inches
(116 x 62 x 12 mm)
4.90 oz  (139 g)
Battery1500 mAh, 8 hours talk time

Latest stories