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What will it take for Google to bring 64-bit support to Android?

0. phoneArena 27 Dec 2013, 12:31 posted on

Last week, I posed the question concerning how much credit Apple deserves for the coming 64-bit evolution. The TL:DR version goes like this: 64-bit was already in the works in mobile in various ways. Apple certainly built the base quickly, and switched over its platform quite seamlessly, but being first to fully push into 64-bit doesn't necessarily mean that Apple deserves credit for something that was inevitable...

This is a discussion for a news. To read the whole news, click here

posted on 27 Dec 2013, 12:45 6

1. starandmountain (Posts: 53; Member since: 01 Apr 2012)


nice story again! thanks:)

posted on 27 Dec 2013, 12:59 8

10. rf1975 (Posts: 258; Member since: 01 Aug 2011)


Only different is, if this was done by any other manufacturer or Google, then most of them including PA will call it as a real innovation.

posted on 27 Dec 2013, 13:41 3

18. Ashoaib (Posts: 3229; Member since: 15 Nov 2013)


What will it take from google to bring 64bit support? very simple answer.... a hard work for few months, and thats it... ;)

posted on 27 Dec 2013, 14:12 4

29. androiphone20 (Posts: 1654; Member since: 10 Jul 2013)


I recommend you go through the article again, it wont go down that easy pushing 64bit support will likely be seen next to Nexus 7 (2014) and is also too early. Google will have to ask developers who use native code (NDK) to move to 64bit. Manufactures and developers would have to wait for Google's call but some already rushed to it (Sammy)

posted on 27 Dec 2013, 16:13 4

52. tedkord (Posts: 12304; Member since: 17 Jun 2009)


Very few apps in Android use native code. Most are written in Java. Hardware drivers, the ROM itself, yes. Those aren't Google's responsibility.

The other consideration is we don't know what work Android has already done. It doesn't become open source until they release it.

This isn't going to be nearly as difficult as some partisans want to paint it.

posted on 27 Dec 2013, 23:22 2

82. JakeLee (banned) (Posts: 1021; Member since: 02 Nov 2013)


What do you think is in the ROM? AOSP by none other than Google.

And what does make you think most apps are written in Java?

Google introduced NDK around the launch of Eclair, and it's exactly the time Android apps became interesting.

posted on 28 Dec 2013, 02:05 1

87. arcone1 (Posts: 18; Member since: 28 Dec 2013)


Most apps are written in java, most games are written in native - this is why Google introduced NDK, to allow seamless and easy way to port games.

posted on 28 Dec 2013, 06:03

102. JakeLee (banned) (Posts: 1021; Member since: 02 Nov 2013)


I'd say most simple client apps.

I don't think PowerAmp is written in Java. Hard to imagine fft running properly when written in Java.

posted on 28 Dec 2013, 11:41 1

117. KRONeage (Posts: 144; Member since: 17 Apr 2011)


Java is actually a great language to code in. Because of it being a containerized Application layer. That can be written in any language for near any system. Including 64bit Apps and games on PC's to mobiles.

Even the greatest games can run in the Dalvik VM and it.... unlike Java can run more than one App at a time. You can stuff a monster 4K video in a java VM. Because it's designed as a cross platform equalizing container capable of even running a whole OS if a developer wants it to inside a VM. Not unlike Sun's Looking Glass Project!

But..... Google has a whole new ground up written replacement in Android Kit-Kat for a runtime replacement and it's actually no longer compiled at run time with a "Just in time Compiler (JIT)". The libraries for Android aren't just Java you know. They've written some of their own code and all they're doing is making it easier for developers to code in a high level language they already know!

Would any developer in his right mind stuff any high end game to run in a Java VM today? Not on your life! ....but Android is a different story. Especially with the new Dalvik replacement compiled at install. Like games on desktops or Consoles!

posted on 28 Dec 2013, 14:09 1

118. tedkord (Posts: 12304; Member since: 17 Jun 2009)


What is in the ROM depends on the OEM. If it were simply AOSP, updates would be almost instantaneous.

Most apps are written in java because it's simpler, easier to debug and has almost no penalty because of Dalvik.

posted on 27 Dec 2013, 23:19 2

81. JakeLee (banned) (Posts: 1021; Member since: 02 Nov 2013)


An extremely hard work for a whole year at least, and lots of extra workloads for many years to come - all thanks to the fragmentation.

posted on 29 Dec 2013, 16:17

124. arcone1 (Posts: 18; Member since: 28 Dec 2013)


Iit's at most few month of work (which is probably done already).

posted on 27 Dec 2013, 14:32 3

32. Droid_X_Doug (Posts: 5993; Member since: 22 Dec 2010)


+1 on thanks for the informative article. Given the timeline for 64-bit to fully populate (hardware, O/S and apps), it would seem that rushing to upgrade to 64-bit in the Android space until probably 2015 is something of a fools errand.

posted on 27 Dec 2013, 17:47

65. steedsofwar (unregistered)


To me the article is saying that

a) it isn't really to do with 64bit but more to do with armv8? which the i5s has?
b) even though the i5s has armv8 and 64bit ready and has optimised its OS to be compatible, the app store apps are yet to update and enjoy the benefits. i.e. Apple is two thirds of the way there.
c) even in its current form, the improvements in real world usage over the other 32bit non armv8 devices is still arguably negligible RIGHT NOW.
d) It isn't hard for Google to do the same as Apple but they ARE behind. Samsung will simply meet one third of the equation by providing the hardware for the other two parts to catch up i.e. the OS (up tp Google to optimise) and the apps (up to individual apps to optimise).

posted on 27 Dec 2013, 12:45 2

2. Rajanvir (Posts: 56; Member since: 11 Dec 2013)


I m just waiting for LG G3 with NVIDIA Tegra 5 inside

posted on 27 Dec 2013, 13:22 2

16. Teja171 (unregistered)


According to the rumours, the LG G3 will come with their home grown LG ODIN octa-core soc.... Even i wish that it comes with an Nvidia Soc. :)

posted on 27 Dec 2013, 13:43

19. Ashoaib (Posts: 3229; Member since: 15 Nov 2013)


Shhhhh! LG is reading n they will release with tegra5 for you :p

posted on 27 Dec 2013, 14:34 1

33. Droid_X_Doug (Posts: 5993; Member since: 22 Dec 2010)


Hopefully the manufacturers will focus on other areas to innovate. Like camera modules with full OIS and low-noise image processing. That would helpd bridge the roughly 2 year gap before 64-bit was fully populated.

posted on 27 Dec 2013, 12:49 7

3. Loubielou (Posts: 513; Member since: 11 Jul 2012)


Samsung deserves the Credit not Apple for creating the 64gb bit processor,thats whats people have got stop praising Apple to much,without Samsung ,Apple would find it hard to get someone else to do this for them,just can"t wait to see the new Samsung Galaxy S5 at the MWC

posted on 27 Dec 2013, 12:49 11

4. PapaSmurf (Posts: 10457; Member since: 14 May 2012)


... You mean ARM?

posted on 27 Dec 2013, 12:58 3

9. rf1975 (Posts: 258; Member since: 01 Aug 2011)


There is a big different between manufacturing & designing.

posted on 27 Dec 2013, 12:59 1

12. bigstrudel (Posts: 518; Member since: 20 Aug 2012)


Thats like saying you created a peice of furniture that came out of Ikea.

posted on 27 Dec 2013, 13:02 3

13. Quezdagreat (Posts: 428; Member since: 05 Apr 2012)


Apple designed, samsung manufactured and copied

posted on 27 Dec 2013, 16:16 4

54. tedkord (Posts: 12304; Member since: 17 Jun 2009)


Samsung copied something that ARM announced as coming out in Q1 2014 a full year before the A7? That's prescient.

posted on 27 Dec 2013, 18:54

69. Quezdagreat (Posts: 428; Member since: 05 Apr 2012)


How come they called it a marketing gimmick when Apple came out with it even though Samsung manufactured it?

posted on 28 Dec 2013, 14:14

119. tedkord (Posts: 12304; Member since: 17 Jun 2009)


Because the 64bit was a marketing gimmick aimed at people who think 64bit means twice as good as 32bit. They retracted it because they are and have been for some time planning their own 64bit mobile SOCs (also based on ARMs new instruction set) and knew that the comments would haunt them later.

posted on 29 Dec 2013, 13:57

121. Quezdagreat (Posts: 428; Member since: 05 Apr 2012)


64 bit is a gimmick for android because the os is not 64 bit ready

posted on 27 Dec 2013, 23:55 3

84. kabhijeet.16 (Posts: 811; Member since: 05 Dec 2012)


Samsung created the 64-bit chip for Apple..
Apple used it..
So apple is innovative...
LOL

posted on 27 Dec 2013, 13:48 3

20. Ashoaib (Posts: 3229; Member since: 15 Nov 2013)


this is a thing, people praise apple for making designs on paper although it doesnt has a capacity to create anything physically, while the one(sammy) who has a capacity n capability to do things practicly is booed for copy

posted on 27 Dec 2013, 14:18 2

30. bigstrudel (Posts: 518; Member since: 20 Aug 2012)


Dude its normal procedure for every smartphone maker to part out their manufacturing. Every Galaxy device sold in the US in the last couple years is using processors designed in the US by Qualcomm and fabricated in Taiwan.

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