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Tim Cook helps Apple be more appealing to the enterprise

Posted: , by Scott H.

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Tim Cook helps Apple be more appealing to the enterprise
Apple is a consumer electronics company. Its products are intentionally aimed at meeting the needs of consumers, and former CEO Steve Jobs was notorious for being his abrasive and dismissive attitude towards corporate requests on his products.

This didn’t come out of nowhere of course. The enterprise market completely abandoned Macintosh computers during the 1990s, helping Windows become ubiquitous and nearly forcing Apple into bankruptcy. Jobs has a long memory. And when a Jobs-lead Apple was resurgent the very attributes that made it effective with consumers, like utter secrecy prior to product launches, flew in the face of IT personnel that try to plan out a company’s budget years in advance. So for many years the feeling of antipathy was mutual.

Yet a funny thing has happened the last decade. Consumer products like the iPhone (and Android) were so popular that many employees demanded to be allowed to use them at work. As IT departments vetted the new phones, they discovered that writing custom apps could actually increase efficiency. The launch of the iPad allowed many companies to replace physical media, or bulky laptop computers, furthering the reach of Apple products into corporate America. Through it all, according to observers, Steve Jobs remained as frank and abrasive as ever with CIOs.

One thing Tim Cook brings to this equation is his willingness to engage with enterprise customers. As Cook has taken on a larger role at Apple, earnings calls have begun to report rates of enterprise adoption of iOS products. And according to those working around him Cook actively meets with corporate customers and addresses their needs, even as he keeps Apple’s ship pointed strongly in the direction of consumers.

Many questions remain about what impact Tim Cook’s leadership will have on Apple in the coming years, but improvements he has made in the relationship of Apple with large businesses can only help them find new sources of revenue in the coming years.

source: New York Times via TUAW

27 Comments
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posted on 16 Nov 2011, 12:11 3

1. Rayzin (Posts: 83; Member since: 27 Oct 2011)


Whatever happened to "fight the man!" apple?

posted on 16 Nov 2011, 12:29 8

3. audiblenarcotic (Posts: 108; Member since: 16 Nov 2011)


They became the man.

posted on 16 Nov 2011, 12:54 6

5. remixfa (Posts: 13902; Member since: 19 Dec 2008)


now its "fight apple". lol. 1984 in 2011...

posted on 16 Nov 2011, 14:57 3

13. iKingTrust (banned) (Posts: 716; Member since: 27 Jul 2011)


Yes we have become the MAN. Now bow down. HAHAHAHAAa

posted on 16 Nov 2011, 15:53 3

18. remixfa (Posts: 13902; Member since: 19 Dec 2008)


you nothing.. just because you buy an apple product doesnt make you "the man".. there would be a better word for it, but i dont feel like stepping down to the troll level.

posted on 16 Nov 2011, 12:23 3

2. cncrim (Posts: 419; Member since: 15 Aug 2011)


This article help me explain the point i'm try to make when Steve Job running apple. Steve with elegan and stubbon, help Micsoft. And here again with mobile area, if apple keep up the same way Steve did Android will crush them same way Window did, Google did

posted on 16 Nov 2011, 13:13 1

6. Slammer (Posts: 817; Member since: 03 Jun 2010)


The apogee of Apple, was due in part to Steve's amalgamated technical aspects with his ability in precise timing of his marketing and sales tactics. To continue this future success, the new management team will have to literally become; Steve Jobs.

John B.

posted on 16 Nov 2011, 12:42 3

4. Slammer (Posts: 817; Member since: 03 Jun 2010)


As a consumer that lived through those older days, I was part of that movement to speak with our feet. I have continually tried to convey my opinion that Steve Jobs and Apple were totally close minded and inexcusably ignored requests from us consumers. In essence, it was Apple's way, or the highway.

Fast forward to today:

While I am not dismissing the accomplishments of Steve Jobs, his tenure nor Apple's, changed from those days. Apple announced the ipod followed by the iphone. This garnered a new interest from a new generation that didn't live through our experiences with Apple.

This new generation re-created a lust for a product because of savvy marketing, and negated all we fought for just because of the iPhone.

The iPhone may have changed the Wireless Industry, but it also changed the intuition mindset of the young.

Obviously, the corporations have continued their quest to set Apple's directive straight, or Apple's new management would not be trying to make mends with the entities that gave them a second chance.

In case anyone wants to take my opinion out of context, I want to clarify that Apple always made a great product as they do today. I supported Apple by purchasing their products and continued until their MO was finally recognized. It is not the product that I vehemently oppose but rather how Apple was marred by initiating their own set of proprietary rules in which most of our generation was not willing to buy into. It was OUR money and we expected our requests to be scaled as such. Today's generation seems to overlook all the corner cutting Apple implements, just to make record profits on their products from their consumers.

Let's hope Apple's new management team will continue to flourish as a composite compilation of implementing a better consumer relationship through customer needs rather than just the marketing prowness defined as "Sheeple".

John B.

posted on 16 Nov 2011, 14:00 2

9. taco50 (banned) (Posts: 5506; Member since: 08 Oct 2009)


This long worthless essays are getting really tiresome. No one is forced to buy Apple products. People can get by through life without a single Apple product as we're often reminded by all the android fanboys on this website. If you don't like it DON'T BUY IT.

People buy Apple because they choose to. They like the product. Apple's market share is no where near dominant either. If Apple doesn't meet your requests buy something else. End of story.

posted on 16 Nov 2011, 15:12 5

15. iamcc (Posts: 1319; Member since: 07 Oct 2011)


If you don't want to read the long posts, don't.

Ready for this?

"[These] long worthless [posts by taco] are getting really tiresome. No one is forced to [read posts]. People can get through life without a single [troll post] as we're often reminded by all the Android fanboys on this website. If you don't like [the post] DON'T READ IT.

People [post long posts] because they [care about their opinion]. They like [freedom of speech]. [Trolls on this site are] no where near dominant either. If [peoples posts rub you the wrong way] read somewhere else. End of story."

You like what I did there?

posted on 16 Nov 2011, 15:32 2

17. hunted (Posts: 287; Member since: 21 Sep 2011)


i love your answer :)

posted on 16 Nov 2011, 15:54 3

19. remixfa (Posts: 13902; Member since: 19 Dec 2008)


id buy you a beer for that one.. brilliant. :)

posted on 16 Nov 2011, 16:11 3

20. iamcc (Posts: 1319; Member since: 07 Oct 2011)


Yeah, I just wish for once taco would reply to my posts. It seems like every time I shut him down he just runs off with his tail between his legs and starts trolling on a different article.

For once i'd like to have an actual debate with him, but that would require facts from both sides... and we all know how taco feels about facts.

posted on 16 Nov 2011, 17:28

21. taco50 (banned) (Posts: 5506; Member since: 08 Oct 2009)


what are we debating exactly?

posted on 16 Nov 2011, 21:14 1

26. iamcc (Posts: 1319; Member since: 07 Oct 2011)


Exactly.

posted on 16 Nov 2011, 13:16 1

7. axed97 (Posts: 16; Member since: 19 Aug 2011)


Kind of makes you think if jobs were alive would cook go in this direction. i mean busness wise it is a great move but jobs had been notorious for running a tight ship and not allowing other companys to change how his product operated, so we will see how cook is with the reings on apple so far it looks promasing for them

posted on 16 Nov 2011, 13:35 1

8. Slammer (Posts: 817; Member since: 03 Jun 2010)


The business enterprise is a very powerful entity. It had given Apple a second chance by reason of a new era and new generation. It appears the enterprise was growing tired of abstinence on the part of Apple. This consequently would eventually have led to technological revolution.

Making a great product is important. However, it should never be at the compromise of what a business or person requires.

This is a double edge sword for Apple. They are willing to negotiate better relationships with corporations, yet without the finesse and eloquence of Steve, they will be left with their own edited plans in keeping elevated interest amoungst the consumers.

John B.

posted on 16 Nov 2011, 14:08 3

10. taco50 (banned) (Posts: 5506; Member since: 08 Oct 2009)


As dominant as Apple has been in the consumer market they will be even more dominant in the corporate world. Business users are already flocking to the iPhone. Over 60% are picking Apple over other non blackberry options like android and windows. This makes sense. Apple has the most stable and easy to use OS. Business users are grown adults that need to accomplish tasks. They don't care about live wall paper and custom roms. iPhone is the future in the corporate world along with iPad.

posted on 16 Nov 2011, 14:29

12. tacohunter (Posts: 408; Member since: 06 Nov 2011)


True.

posted on 16 Nov 2011, 19:42

24. tedkord (Posts: 3920; Member since: 17 Jun 2009)


If you rewind about 30 years ago, that was what Apple followers (and Steve Jobs) believed about the Macintosh. It would dominate. Then along came a platform that was more open, supported any hardware (not just what the OS maker wanted to support), and gave consumers choice. We know what happened then.

The same will happen here, be it Android or Windows Phone, or some unknown. The platform that gives choice ppdevelops faster, grows more. Apple forces itself into a niche. TUOr did - who knows what a post

posted on 16 Nov 2011, 19:59

25. tedkord (Posts: 3920; Member since: 17 Jun 2009)


If you rewind about 30 years ago, that was what Apple followers (and Steve Jobs) believed about the Macintosh. It would dominate. Then along came a platform that was more open, supported any hardware (not just what the OS maker wanted to support), and gave consumers choice. We know what happened then.

They thought they could rely on the OSx experience, and that specs and consumer choice didn't matter. Unfortunately for them, because it could support any hardware, PCs shot past Macs in speed and function, and were so far out front that Apple had to finally admit defeat, and switch to Intel x86 architecture.

The same will happen here, be it Android or Windows Phone, or some unknown. The platform that gives choice develops faster, grows more. Apple forces itself into a niche. Or did - who knows what a post Jobs Apple will do?

At this point, Android is evolving at a much faster pace than iOS. It's gotten features within a year that took Apple 3 years to implement. It rivals the iPhone experience on the latest devices, and is surpassing it in some areas, to the point that iOS is now copying Android features.

Apple has mindshare for now. And they earned it by leapfrogging the market with the original iPhone. They also have a rabid, cult-like fan base that will get an iPhone just because its an iPhone (like my sister-in-law). But since then, they've lagged Android in advancement.

This is the true, true story. We know it, because we've already seen it play out.

posted on 16 Nov 2011, 14:29

11. axed97 (Posts: 16; Member since: 19 Aug 2011)


and with blackberry floundering apple is the next best option

posted on 16 Nov 2011, 14:58 1

14. iKingTrust (banned) (Posts: 716; Member since: 27 Jul 2011)


I love this guy tim cook

posted on 16 Nov 2011, 15:26 3

16. Slammer (Posts: 817; Member since: 03 Jun 2010)


Correct. No one is forced to purchase anything. Yet, in some cases, they are. You consistantly remain passive on my intended reasoning of what defines sheeple marketing and how it dictates a market.

Whether you fall into the realms of this status quo or not, doesn't change my experience or observations. Many purchase Apple products out of legitimate preferences. Most fall under the mainstay of followship. I work around many teens and young adults under 26. I will contend, without evading my belief, that the largest percentage of these groups have no idea what the iPhone has differently from the other phones. You don't see a pattern how the generation of college students and below, shifted their desire from Blackberry to an iPhone? The common denominator, is that it is trend of nature. It is a status symbol of feeling elite. I can literally walk into any college or high school and view a mass integration with the iPhone. When asked what why they chose the iphone, it is split down the middle. Some will say that they chose it because their friends have one. This falls under making a choice. Others say that the college has adopted the Apple platform and it works best for linking to the curriculum. By this practice, Apple has leveraged serious sheeple marketing not only by spending billions on widespread advertising, but also addressing a market of the group most likely needing the product.

As I stated in the previous post, businesses gave Apple a second chance and are still adopting the platform, but the above article also proves their reluctance under possibilities. To you, Apple makes sense. In all honesty, I may find it makes sense too. But what you are failing to observe, is that the article clearly states as many of us believe. We run multi-million dollar businesses and will not tolerate what vendor we choose, to dictate what we can or cannot have. Stability is only good when coupled with the programs needed. If Apple is not willing to provide our businesses with said tools, then we won't remain with said vendor. "End of Story".

John B.

P.S. If you don't like my lengthy essays, may I suggest you don't read them. But to be congenial as possible, I will continue to offer my opinion. That's what these forums are for.....yes?

posted on 16 Nov 2011, 17:29

22. taco50 (banned) (Posts: 5506; Member since: 08 Oct 2009)


ok Charlie Brown. Wa wa wa

posted on 16 Nov 2011, 18:07 2

23. Slammer (Posts: 817; Member since: 03 Jun 2010)


Interesting retort considering that Charles Schultz and Steve Jobs were fairly similar in character. Both were non stop workers, very set in their ways, paid attention to detail, and refused to follow status quo. If they couldn't do it themselves, they were hard pressed to have someone do it for them.

John B.

posted on 16 Nov 2011, 21:17

27. iamcc (Posts: 1319; Member since: 07 Oct 2011)


Bad taco.

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