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Hacker gets 41 months in the slammer for stealing personal data of 100,000 AT&T Apple iPad customers

0. phoneArena 18 Mar 2013, 15:16 posted on

Andrew Auernheimer, better known by his online handle 'Weev', was sentenced to 41 months in federal prison for hacking the names of over 100,000 Apple iPad users who had signed up with AT&T; a security flaw in the registration process allowed the 'Weev' to commit the crime which constituted a violation of the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act...

This is a discussion for a news. To read the whole news, click here

posted on 18 Mar 2013, 15:20 1

1. tech2 (Posts: 1749; Member since: 26 Oct 2012)


Alan, you are missing a zero in 100,000 in the title :)

posted on 18 Mar 2013, 19:05 1

10. Alan01 (Posts: 171; Member since: 21 Mar 2012)


Thanks for nothing...get it! Nothing, Zero,
Ah....Thanks!

Alan F.

posted on 18 Mar 2013, 19:21

12. PAPINYC (Posts: 2177; Member since: 30 Jul 2011)


OMG, I totally get it. I haven't laughed so hard since Windows Mobile changed its' name to WP and claimed not to be a mobile Operating System. Or, like when Apple released the upgrade iPad 2 and called it "New iPad". Or, like when CBS thought Ashton Kutcher could replace Charlie Sheen. [Let me wipe the puddle I just made]

posted on 18 Mar 2013, 15:20 2

2. Bernoulli (Posts: 1432; Member since: 01 Sep 2012)


Dang sucks to be with at&t, so glad to be a former customer! :)

posted on 18 Mar 2013, 15:22 2

3. PAPINYC (Posts: 2177; Member since: 30 Jul 2011)


It certainly would've been a much harsher punishment if they had sentenced him to using an iPad on AT&T for six months; if you ask me, he got off easy in the penn'. Now he'll just work on his revenge aka his "masterpiece".

posted on 18 Mar 2013, 15:59 4

5. darkkjedii (Posts: 10079; Member since: 05 Feb 2011)


The sad part is that you really think that too.

posted on 18 Mar 2013, 19:37

13. PAPINYC (Posts: 2177; Member since: 30 Jul 2011)


I not only think it but, I know it first hand. Ergo: AT&T; Cincular; AT&T.

posted on 18 Mar 2013, 20:18

14. darkkjedii (Posts: 10079; Member since: 05 Feb 2011)


C'mon pap

posted on 18 Mar 2013, 20:47

16. PAPINYC (Posts: 2177; Member since: 30 Jul 2011)


okay, AT&T has wonderful service; the best in the world!

posted on 26 Mar 2013, 22:03

21. Bernoulli (Posts: 1432; Member since: 01 Sep 2012)


Bro how have you been? ! I thought you died or something! Glad to see you troll back! :)

posted on 18 Mar 2013, 15:23

4. ebubekir26 (Posts: 307; Member since: 21 Dec 2012)


http://farm6.staticflickr.com/5315/7180929129_369bef6b28_z.jpg
http://www.facebook.com/weevlos
http://www.facebook.com/andrew.auernheimer
he even has a facebook fanpage:
http://www.facebook.com/pages/weev/133825513324340?rf=111077155610553

posted on 18 Mar 2013, 16:04

6. Droid_X_Doug (Posts: 5527; Member since: 22 Dec 2010)


I doubt that Andy is going to have access to computers or the Internet while on his 'vacation'. Perhaps he may get to take up tennis or basket weaving? Although with his attitude, he may have some experiences he would rather not repeat on the outside.

posted on 18 Mar 2013, 20:54

17. PAPINYC (Posts: 2177; Member since: 30 Jul 2011)


Dude, look at him, I doubt anyone is that desparate!

I'm not against gay marriage but, that would just be wrong.

posted on 18 Mar 2013, 16:13

7. Droiddoes (unregistered)


How sad. He would've done far less time, if any, for molesting a kid. America.

posted on 18 Mar 2013, 17:40 6

8. 14545 (Posts: 1055; Member since: 22 Nov 2011)


Can someone explain why att should be paid the restitution and not the customers? Screw att and this decision. It's att fault that the data was compromised. If restitution should be paid, it should be paid to the individuals that had their data compromised, NOT ATT. Idiot prosecutors.

posted on 18 Mar 2013, 19:03 3

9. darkkjedii (Posts: 10079; Member since: 05 Feb 2011)


Agreed

posted on 18 Mar 2013, 19:08 2

11. pixelado (Posts: 130; Member since: 16 Feb 2013)


Agreed, it's like Sony asked for money after getting raped by hackers back in 2011. They took the blame for having weak security and rewarded affected customers.

posted on 18 Mar 2013, 20:19

15. darkkjedii (Posts: 10079; Member since: 05 Feb 2011)


That's Nobel

posted on 18 Mar 2013, 22:13 2

18. ohiwastedmylife (Posts: 17; Member since: 04 Jul 2012)


All he did was build a script that would aggregate all the publicly available web pages and store the information found on each page in a database. There was no actual hacking and it was all on public domains that anyone could access. AT&T should be responsible for not having a secure website and openly displaying customer's information. Since when is caching or storing a webpage or information on a webpage that is open illegal? Im sure if we had direct url links we could google them and find individual cached pages which still show the data.

posted on 19 Mar 2013, 12:53 1

19. hypergreatthing (Posts: 33; Member since: 13 Jun 2012)


summary is incorrect.
AT&T had sensitive information on a public website. He merely collected it and sent it to a news agency to shame AT&T to fix it.
Stolen? Exactly how was anything stolen? Illegally obtained? How in the hell do you get that?
The implications of the laws applied would make it so that anyone using the internet is illegally obtaining information and applicable to the same sort of crime this guy committed. You should really read up on this case because it's completely assinine.

posted on 20 Mar 2013, 19:07

20. ZeroCide (Posts: 683; Member since: 09 Jan 2013)


So True!!!!

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