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Gorilla Glass 3 vs steel ball vs 100 pounds pressure (video)

Posted: , by Daniel P.

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Gorilla Glass 3 vs steel ball vs 100 pounds pressure (video)

Corning announced the third edition of its mighty popular with smartphone and tablet manufacturers Gorilla Glass a bit before CES 2013 started, and it has a booth there to actually showcase what the new “Native Damage Resistance” is all about.

In there, you can subject Gorilla Glass 3 to a beating by a heavy steel ball, and it will still escape unscathed, unlike those other fragile glass types out there. Or, as Corning puts it:

Gorilla Glass 3 is not only chemically strengthened — its atomic configuration is formulated so that the glass is less brittle, and fundamentally tougher and more damage resistant even before chemical strengthening.


The Native Damage Resistance composite offers up to 40% reduction in visible scratches for your smartphone and tablet that you will be purchasing this year, as GG3 samples are now with manufacturers, and products with it are coming in the summer.

As for the flexible Willow Glass Corning is also working on - the reps have mentioned this is still being ironed out and tested, so you can put those bendy display thoughts on the backburner for now, at least from Corning's side of things.


23 Comments
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posted on 08 Jan 2013, 14:46 10

1. PhoneArenaUser (Posts: 5497; Member since: 05 Aug 2011)


Manufacturers says that Dragontrail Glass is six times stronger than Gorilla Glass 2 (which is same as Gorilla Glass just 20% thinner). Would be interesting to compare Gorilla Glass 3 with Dragontrail Glass. :)

posted on 08 Jan 2013, 14:55 6

3. PhoneArenaUser (Posts: 5497; Member since: 05 Aug 2011)


Correction:

Manufacturers says that Dragontrail Glass is six times stronger than Soda Lime Glass.

posted on 08 Jan 2013, 15:51 8

8. PhoneArenaUser (Posts: 5497; Member since: 05 Aug 2011)


Two thumbs down just because I have told the fact? Some people are in denial with reality...

posted on 09 Jan 2013, 03:13 2

17. MeoCao (unregistered)


a thumb up for the truth :)

posted on 09 Jan 2013, 04:40 1

18. PhoneArenaUser (Posts: 5497; Member since: 05 Aug 2011)


Thanks. :)

posted on 09 Jan 2013, 00:10 2

13. bayusuputra (Posts: 943; Member since: 12 Feb 2012)


dragontrail is stronger in specs. I, too, would like to see how the two compare side by side.

posted on 09 Jan 2013, 03:12

16. MeoCao (unregistered)


I trust Sony in this, they selected Dragontrail means this is the best.

posted on 08 Jan 2013, 14:46 1

2. InspectorGadget80 (Posts: 6729; Member since: 26 Mar 2011)


The only thing i dislike bout their demo is they use a steel ball. Why couldn't they just use a hammer AND USE FORCE to see how really strong GROILLA GLASS is? I still enjoy my GORILLA GLASS 2 on my ATRIX. But this test kinda stump me on how much force they use though

posted on 08 Jan 2013, 14:59 1

4. PhoneArenaUser (Posts: 5497; Member since: 05 Aug 2011)


"Why couldn't they just use a hammer AND USE FORCE to see how really strong GROILLA GLASS is?"

1. Because in such way you can't make proper comparison between different examples of glass.

2. It won't give you any actual results about experiment.

posted on 08 Jan 2013, 15:27

7. Zero0 (Posts: 583; Member since: 05 Jul 2012)


They did.

The ball test used gravity on a ball and the second test applied a 100 pound force.

posted on 08 Jan 2013, 17:36 3

10. simplyj (Posts: 404; Member since: 23 Dec 2009)


too many variables.

take physics and you'll understand all about force.

posted on 09 Jan 2013, 04:43 3

19. PhoneArenaUser (Posts: 5497; Member since: 05 Aug 2011)


True! It is exactly what I want to say in my comment #4.

posted on 08 Jan 2013, 17:57

11. roscuthiii (Posts: 1873; Member since: 18 Jul 2010)


That's exactly the problem with using steel balls... no variables. Real life throws variables. This is the reason why "one size fits all" has been changed to "one size fits most" , and they still both have relatively crappy fits.
Could you imagine if vehicle manufacturers reduced their amount of variables for safety testing? Probably wouldn't go over well, would it?
More variables are always better for testing like this, they just make the testing more complicated.
Less variables is only better when you're trying to determine a cause... in this instance, we already know that the cause was the steel ball.

posted on 09 Jan 2013, 00:32 3

14. bayusuputra (Posts: 943; Member since: 12 Feb 2012)


dude, they want to show the max pressure that can be applied. Of course this is not a real life test, this is called controlled experiment, where they only want to know about a single constant variable to be compared against the other subject without other variables affecting the result.

This is elementary school experiment thing. Seems like you only took humanities subjects.

"Could you imagine if vehicle manufacturers reduced their amount of variables for safety testing? Probably wouldn't go over well, would it?"

It will go well. With only single variable being tested, they will know the results more thoroughly. Have you seen any testing videos where manufacturer drop a phone from 6 feet while pouring/showering water and flexing the phone? No.
They will do separate tests for water resistance, shock resistance, flex, key presses, etc. if they go by real life examples, then there will be billions of possibilities, including (but not limited to) dog bites, dip in toilet bowl with a dead fish/sh1ts inside, run over by different cars, drop from pocket/shoulder/head/table/cupboard/car/airplane.

And in this case, the cause is not the steel ball, but rather the pressure created from it. You could replace steel ball with wooden/glass/plastic/marble/stone/scrotum, as long as they are being used throughout so that the pressure created on both object would be constant.

learn how to do a good science experiment.

posted on 09 Jan 2013, 11:27

20. TBomb (Posts: 170; Member since: 28 Dec 2012)


i feel like a scrotum wouldnt do much damage to anything but i'll give it to ya haha you got my thumbs up

posted on 09 Jan 2013, 21:46

22. roscuthiii (Posts: 1873; Member since: 18 Jul 2010)


The problem is that I get exactly what a good science experiment is. And that's exactly what is, a good science experiment, but lab conditions rarely equate to real world experience.
It's like the miles-per-gallon specs or internet speeds that car manufacturers and ISP's like to post, respectively and expecting those to be the standard experience. Yes, they're nice specs to know but about all their good for is bragging rights in marketing.

posted on 21 Jan 2013, 10:02

23. bayusuputra (Posts: 943; Member since: 12 Feb 2012)


So all the car crash testing facilities are doing useless tests because they are controlled tests?

oh, boy, how many cars/phones/airplanes/balls do we need to waste to create every single real life conditions..

SMH..

posted on 09 Jan 2013, 00:36

15. desijatt (Posts: 57; Member since: 28 Aug 2012)


they should stick it to a phone and hit it with a hammer on one of it's edge...thats what naturally happens....screens broke from edges not from centre...

posted on 08 Jan 2013, 15:00 1

5. OHaZZaR (Posts: 131; Member since: 19 Aug 2011)


I liked the old picture better. It looked beautiful with the gorilla staring at the glass. That one had a real looking gorilla. This one's obviously CG.

posted on 08 Jan 2013, 15:23 1

6. sprockkets (Posts: 1356; Member since: 16 Jan 2012)


I'll be impressed when they demo dropping a smartphone without the scene breaking.

posted on 08 Jan 2013, 22:42 3

12. JC557 (Posts: 1162; Member since: 07 Dec 2011)


I'll be more impressed when they drop a Nokia 3310 on it... =P

posted on 08 Jan 2013, 17:14

9. techloverNYC (Posts: 422; Member since: 20 Nov 2012)


i thought the next generation glass is the bendable glass? u know the glass I think samsung show that u can bend, that is literally unbreakable I think. this glass is not that special

posted on 09 Jan 2013, 11:50

21. jaytai0106 (Posts: 1458; Member since: 30 Mar 2011)


I see and understand the screen is tough. But do they realize the fact they used a 1 ~ 1.5" screen to show how strong the glass is and most smartphones have 4.3"-4.7" screen size now. On a second note, the glass had nothing behind it, so this allowed the glass to bend a little bit. A glass on a smartphone usually don't have any room to bend. Let's put the glass on a dummy phone and do a drop/throw against a wall test :D

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