x PhoneArena is looking for new authors! To view all available positions, click here.
  • Home
  • News
  • FTC reaches deal with Google over FRAND patents

FTC reaches deal with Google over FRAND patents

Posted: , by Alan F.

Tags:

FTC reaches deal with Google over FRAND patents
When Google acquired Motorola in 2011, the acquisition came with a number of standards-essential patents owned by Motorola. These are patents for parts and technology that are "essential" to the manufacture of certain products and as a result, licensing these patents is supposed to be done in a Fair, Reasonable and Non-Discriminatory (FRAND) manner. Google, though, had been using these patents to threaten other companies interested in licensing them with injunctions and import bans in order to secure more favorable terms.

On Wednesday, Google and the FTC finalized a settlement that would prevent the FTC from taking action against Google under Section 5 of the FCC Act which covers unfair or deceptive business practices. The Feds' argument is that Google is using these patents as weapons against competitors like Apple and Microsoft.

Under the terms of the agreement, Google can no longer use a FRAND patent as a reason to seek a injunction or import ban as long as the other company is within the jurisdiction of  U.S. Courts. It would appear that we will see a gentler, kinder Google involved in patent negotiations in the future.

source: FTC via AllThingsD

10 Comments
  • Options
    Close




posted on 24 Jul 2013, 14:14 6

1. MrPhilo (Posts: 41; Member since: 25 Feb 2013)


I'd love to punch these FTC peeps in there faces sometimes.

posted on 24 Jul 2013, 21:21 2

10. InspectorGadget80 (Posts: 5632; Member since: 26 Mar 2011)


Please let me THROW THE FIRST PUNCH. it's a good thing GOOGLE purchase MOTOROLA. I don't see FTC barking at Apple when they purchase other companies

posted on 24 Jul 2013, 14:24 5

2. sprockkets (Posts: 932; Member since: 16 Jan 2012)


" It would appear that we will see a gentler, kinder Google involved in patent negotiations in the future."

You do know that both Apple and MS refused any negotiations and went straight to suing Moto over what they should pay right?

I guess its nice that the FTC should just let "reverse hold up" takes its course, ignoring the fact that injunctions on FRAND patents is perfectly legal (with both MS and Nokia agreeing to it when it benefits them) and the ETSI (which is what standards body manages the FRAND patents in question) has nothing barring injunctions on companies who refuse to accept FRAND terms.

posted on 24 Jul 2013, 14:41 2

3. networkdood (Posts: 5489; Member since: 31 Mar 2010)


The gov't will favor MS, since they employ the company for spying purposes.

posted on 24 Jul 2013, 14:42 1

4. networkdood (Posts: 5489; Member since: 31 Mar 2010)


"It would appear that we will see a gentler, kinder Google involved in patent negotiations in the future."
Phone arena, that is such a dumb statement. Why should they be kind when dealing with Apple and MS?

posted on 24 Jul 2013, 15:03

5. MartyK (Posts: 668; Member since: 11 Apr 2012)


Look at who's the author of this, none other the Apple Alan F;
He always write something bad about Google.. so this shouldn't surprise anyone

posted on 24 Jul 2013, 17:42

8. -box- (Posts: 3564; Member since: 04 Jan 2012)


Imagine, if you will, that Microsoft or apple had acquired Motorola, or perhaps Nokia had. How would you want Motorola's crucial patents and technological IP dealt with? Shared as it was before any acquisition, right? What if Microsoft bought Nokia, or Samsung or apple bought Siemens? Try to be objective and consider multiple perspectives.

posted on 24 Jul 2013, 16:46 1

6. sprockkets (Posts: 932; Member since: 16 Jan 2012)


Actually the decision by the FTC was what it should be: No immediate injunctions but they are allowed if the company stalls.

http://www.groklaw.net/article.php?story=2013072414233398

posted on 24 Jul 2013, 17:35

7. -box- (Posts: 3564; Member since: 04 Jan 2012)


Good. True FRAND should be FRAND.

Ideally, though, companies would offer adequate and agreeable royalties for borrowed tech.

posted on 24 Jul 2013, 21:21 1

9. InspectorGadget80 (Posts: 5632; Member since: 26 Mar 2011)


I'm getting seriously sick and tired of these A.HOLES FTC.

Want to comment? Please login or register.

Latest stories