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European group finds a way to get around the Touch ID on Apple iPhone 5s

0. phoneArena 22 Sep 2013, 17:16 posted on

Saying that the hardest part about hacking the Touch ID fingerprint sensor on the Apple iPhone 5s was finding an iPhone 5s to use, the Chaos Computer Club has found a way to circumvent the new fingerprint sensor on the latest full-featured iPhone; the process requires someone to take a picture of a person's fingerprints at 2400 DPI and then print it at 1200 DPI. The image is used to make a latex sheet that is used to trick the Touch ID sensor...

This is a discussion for a news. To read the whole news, click here

posted on 22 Sep 2013, 17:31 1

1. DukeX (Posts: 327; Member since: 28 Aug 2013)


As i predicted. Thought of this earlier this week. Just not as intricate. A mistake on my part.

posted on 22 Sep 2013, 20:09

6. androiphone20 (Posts: 1518; Member since: 10 Jul 2013)


Is there a complete video from
beginning to end? Without seeing the
steps involved it's kinda pointless.
Anything can be hacked. It's whether
the time and effort to perform the
hack are worth the end result (getting
access to a phone). Creating a fake
finger to open a safe or get access to
a secure area might be worthwhile. I
really doubt anyone would go
through the effort to get the data
that's on your phone.

posted on 25 Sep 2013, 12:03

23. jaychildz (Posts: 106; Member since: 31 May 2013)


Crazy thing is, you can reset any iPhone/AndroidPhone without unlocking it so it's in a sense...your phone now!

posted on 22 Sep 2013, 20:12

7. androiphone20 (Posts: 1518; Member since: 10 Jul 2013)


Is there a complete video from
beginning to end? Without seeing the
steps involved it's kinda pointless.
Anything can be hacked. It's whether
the time and effort to perform the
hack are worth the end result (getting
access to a phone). Creating a fake
finger to open a safe or get access to
a secure area might be worthwhile. I
really doubt anyone would go
through the effort to get the data
that's on your phone.

posted on 22 Sep 2013, 20:20

8. androiphone20 (Posts: 1518; Member since: 10 Jul 2013)


Is there a complete video from
beginning to end? Without seeing the
steps involved it's kinda pointless.
Anything can be hacked. It's whether
the time and effort to perform the
hack are worth the end result (getting
access to a phone). Creating a fake
finger to open a safe or get access to
a secure area might be worthwhile. I
really doubt anyone would go
through the effort to get the data
that's on your phone.

posted on 22 Sep 2013, 20:24

10. androiphone20 (Posts: 1518; Member since: 10 Jul 2013)


Hmmm,
This seems to be fake.
Apple have already explained that the
Touch ID cannot be fooled by a 2-D
image because the sub-epidermal
image it creates is 3-D not 2-D.
Yet these Germans are claiming that a
2-D image on a thin transparent film
fooled the Touch ID sensor
Also Apple say the Touch ID sensor
cannot be fooled by a dead fingerprint
because it will only read the sub-
epidermal layers of a live finger.
SO HOW DID THEY FAKE IT?
It looks very simple.
Notice how the same finger used
teach Touch ID the fingerprint was
then used to pick up a thin
transparent film and put it on the
sensor WITH THE LIVE FINGER on top
of the thin transparent layer..
It seems then that the Touch ID
sensor, which uses capacitors and RF
to see through the dead skin of a
fingerprint to read the sub-epidermal
layers to create the 3-D image, then
looked THROUGH the thin transparent
film at the SAME LIVE FINGERPRINT
used to teach Touch ID the fingerprint
pattern.
In other words it was not reading the
transparent film at all, but the real
fingerprint touching the transparent
film
Let's see if I'm right. If I am how
many millions of dollars do I
get....LOL
Any comments

posted on 22 Sep 2013, 20:39 9

11. hoekone (Posts: 1; Member since: 22 Sep 2013)


You sure put a lot of trust into what Apple says, you know they could be lying to you? most companies do. And no they didnt use the same finger, they scanned the index finger then used the middle finger, watch it again.

posted on 23 Sep 2013, 02:04 1

14. Andrewtst (Posts: 377; Member since: 25 Jan 2009)


You can trust whatever company said?

Come on! Don't too easier trusting people!

posted on 23 Sep 2013, 10:39 1

19. DukeX (Posts: 327; Member since: 28 Aug 2013)


The latex is probably forms around the scanner to fool it to make it appear 3d

posted on 22 Sep 2013, 18:04 2

2. Long1 (banned) (Posts: 399; Member since: 18 May 2013)


" Granted, this is not a quick 1-2-3 process"

Yes, it is:
http://i.imgur.com/thPcXxK.jpg
If it worths

posted on 23 Sep 2013, 15:54

22. reckless562 (Posts: 1011; Member since: 09 Sep 2013)


LOOOOOLLLLL!!!!!!!

posted on 22 Sep 2013, 18:21 3

3. Nathan_ingx (Posts: 3024; Member since: 07 Mar 2012)


Nothing...i mean nothing, is ever so secure, anymore.
They'll build a retina scanner into your phone and that will still be hacked by someone.

posted on 22 Sep 2013, 22:11 1

12. VZWuser76 (Posts: 1876; Member since: 04 Mar 2010)


Hawkeye and Loki did it in The Avengers, albeit gruesomely.

posted on 23 Sep 2013, 15:53

21. reckless562 (Posts: 1011; Member since: 09 Sep 2013)


lols... nerd :D

posted on 22 Sep 2013, 19:02

4. stealthd (Posts: 980; Member since: 12 Jun 2011)


I like how they refer to doing a 2400 dpi scan of someone'se fingerprint as something you can do with everyday materials. TouchID is more about convenience. It is more secure than a 4 digit passcode (or no passcode). You still can't wipe the phone or turn off TouchID with just a fingerprint. The effort it takes here is still impractical for purposes of everyday theft. Unless there are state secrets on your phone I wouldn't worry about this (yet).

posted on 22 Sep 2013, 19:57

5. Credo (Posts: 695; Member since: 19 Apr 2012)


lollllllllllll

posted on 22 Sep 2013, 20:22

9. GeekyGene (Posts: 88; Member since: 25 Aug 2013)


"The process requires someone to take a picture of a person's fingerprints at 2400 DPI"

Ok....

posted on 23 Sep 2013, 01:48 1

13. CX3NT3_713 (Posts: 2010; Member since: 18 Apr 2011)


Buhuhahhahahaaaaaaaa .. @tim Crook

posted on 23 Sep 2013, 02:24 1

15. Sniggly (Posts: 7182; Member since: 05 Dec 2009)


You know, another user on here once mentioned that a possible reason, or at least a factor, in Motorola's decision not to continue with fingerprint sensors was because they could be fooled like this. At the time I couldn't find any material on it but now it might be time to admit I was wrong.

(other factors would have been cost, limitations on design permutations that would allow for a scanner, and low consumer interest.)

posted on 23 Sep 2013, 02:35

16. xnview (Posts: 1; Member since: 23 Sep 2013)


And how often do you get a 2400 DPI scan of your fingerprints? And how many of those scans are made by criminals? I'll still say the fingerprint sensor is the safest lock on a phone these days

posted on 23 Sep 2013, 06:48

17. Googler (Posts: 813; Member since: 10 Jun 2013)


Quote in the article sums it up perfectly. If it's used to log into accounts more quickly, it still has a useful purpose, but deterring someone from stealing your phone isn't likely to happen.

posted on 23 Sep 2013, 07:00

18. nbringer (Posts: 178; Member since: 11 Sep 2012)


I saw it on TV this morning, they bypassed the fingerprint scanner with a cat's paw... pathetic Apple...

posted on 23 Sep 2013, 14:02

20. good2great (Posts: 1040; Member since: 22 Feb 2012)


the hell his hands shaking so much???

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